Spectator on facebook

Spectator on facebook

NEWS IN SHORT

No agreement on dam, 10 years later

TEN years after the International Court of Justice issued a verdict on the failed Slovak-Hungarian twin dam project, Gabčíkovo-Nagymaros, an agreement is still not in sight.

TEN years after the International Court of Justice issued a verdict on the failed Slovak-Hungarian twin dam project, Gabčíkovo-Nagymaros, an agreement is still not in sight.

Budapest and Bratislava interpreted the verdict differently, the Hospodárske Noviny economic daily wrote.

“We are disenchanted and very disappointed that the Hungarian side refuses to look at different alternative solutions to the problem for the whole Bratislava-Budapest section [of the Danube],” said Gabriel Jenčík, the Slovak government proxy for the Gabčíkovo-Nagymaros project.

He says Budapest is only willing to discuss the one solution that would benefit them alone: going ahead without the lower dam at Nagymaros. The Slovak side insists on constructing the dam at Nagymaros, because without it, the Gabčíkovo facility is like “a body without hands”, Jenčík said. Slovak water management experts see this to be the most beneficial option, from the economic and operational points of view.

The main source of the conflict is that the Hungarian side interprets the International Court ruling to mean that, although the intergovernmental agreement on the project is valid, Hungary is absolved of the duty to complete the waterworks according to the original plan, or any other lower dam on the Danube.

The Slovak Environment Ministry is preparing a complex document on the twin-dam project for cabinet. It is expected to be submitted in the first quarter of 2008.

Top stories

How did Communism happen in Czechoslovakia?

For the 40 years, Czechs and Slovaks would celebrate February 25 as Victorious February, even though the enthusiasm of most of those who supported Communists in 1948 would very quickly evaporate.

Prime Minister Klement Gottwald (right) swears an oath into the hands of President Edvard Benes on February 27, 1948 at the Prague Castle.

Cemetery with a remarkable creative concept Photo

The shapes of tombstones were prescribed until 1997

Vrakuňa Cemetery in Bratislava

Being young is harder than it used to be

The failure of older generations to sympathise with youth means politics are primarily a contest of who can hand out more gifts to old people.

Young Slovaks have problems finding proper jobs.

Historian: After 1948, Czechoslovakia was paralysed with fear

On February 25, Czechs and Slovaks mark 70 years since the rise of Communism in their common state. Historian Jan Pešek talks about the coup and its aftermath.

Demonstration in Prague, Wenceslas' Square, on February 28, 1948.