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Every second Slovak unhappy with salary

ALMOST all Slovaks base their job satisfaction on how much they earn, and half of them are unsatisfied with their salary, a new survey shows.

ALMOST all Slovaks base their job satisfaction on how much they earn, and half of them are unsatisfied with their salary, a new survey shows.

A whopping 97 percent picked salary as the most important part of their jobs, according to a survey on job satisfaction by Accor Services Slovakia. The Barometer of Employee Satisfaction and Motivation at Work polled employees in Slovakia and seven other countries.

Employees in private companies with mixed capital expressed the greatest satisfaction with their salaries (65 percent) and employee benefits (71 percent). In contrast, employees in state administration and state-controlled companies are the least satisfied with their salaries (40 and 38 percent, respectively) and employee benefits (37 and 41 percent, respectively).

Most Slovaks, more than 84 percent, are satisfied with their independence at work. More than 70 percent were satisfied with their working hours, work environment, working conditions and the balance between their work and private lives.

Along with salary, working conditions and workplace atmosphere were the most important aspects of job satisfaction for Slovak employees.

Ipsos Loyalty Agency conducted the survey for Accor Services Slovakia in the first half of this year on a sample of 993 employees over 18 years of age.

The poll didn’t include company owners, freelancers, farmers and self-employed trades workers.

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