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Danish cellist wins New Talent Award

CELLIST Toke Moldrup, 27, took home the New Talent 2007 Award for young performers at the Bratislava Music Festival on November 27.

CELLIST Toke Moldrup, 27, took home the New Talent 2007 Award for young performers at the Bratislava Music Festival on November 27.

An international jury selected Moldrup from among three finalists. The award is part of the International Forum of Young Performers competition, which legendary violinist Yehudi Menuhin set up in 1969 to award young European musicians for excellence in the arts.

“The world belongs to young people,” said Philippe Bouncly, the chairman of the board at gas utility SPP, whose foundation supports the award, as he handed Moldrup the glass, harp-shaped prize.

The competition started with eight musicians who had been short-listed from among 20 from across Europe. For the final, Moldrup played the Concert for Cello and Orchestra by Antonín Dvořák.

“I’m very happy,” he said upon winning. “This is my first international award as a soloist.”

Moldrup plays in the respected Kvarteto Paizo Quartet.

The competition’s other two finalists were French violinist Fanny Clamagirand and Norwegian trumpet player Tine Thing Helseth.

The 43rd Bratislava Music Festival ends on December 7.

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