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Garrett Report's findings on Slovakia

The 2000 Garrett Report speaks of the need for military reform, contains an evaluation of the military power of the Slovak Republic, and offers recommendations and proposals. The report also evaluates the most important defence sector documents that have been produced in Slovakia since the beginning of the 1990s. The report contains the following findings:
1. Slovakia is currently reviewing its basic documents, which even now no longer correspond to current defence requirements and concepts. The revised documents (the constitutional Security Law, the National Security Strategy and the National Military Strategy) should provide the basis for the launching of military reform;

The 2000 Garrett Report speaks of the need for military reform, contains an evaluation of the military power of the Slovak Republic, and offers recommendations and proposals. The report also evaluates the most important defence sector documents that have been produced in Slovakia since the beginning of the 1990s. The report contains the following findings:

1. Slovakia is currently reviewing its basic documents, which even now no longer correspond to current defence requirements and concepts. The revised documents (the constitutional Security Law, the National Security Strategy and the National Military Strategy) should provide the basis for the launching of military reform;

2. A deficit exists in the planning and distribution of military resources;

3. In order for Slovakia to be capable of integrating into western military structures, it needs to build smaller, more professional and combat-ready forces. A shortcoming in this area has been created by 'empty' forces with little or no combat-readiness;

4. Most formations are currently staffed at less than 70% of their calculated wartime levels, and thus are dependent on a national mobilization to reach combat-readiness;

5. No unified or national standard for planning the use of funds exists, despite the fact the country is expecting annual GDP growth of between 2% and 3%;

6. The national defence system is seriously disturbed by the coexistence of military and quasi-military elements, as well as the problem of control of armed forces under the jurisdiction of three ministries (Defence Ministry, Interior Ministry, Ministry of Transport, Post and Telecommunications). The situation in Slovakia is far more transparent than in neighboring Ukraine - but then the latter country is not a candidate for NATO entry;

7. The army, in its personnel policies, still operates according to principles inherited from the communist regime;

8. Training problems are regarded as absolutely the gravest issue facing the Slovak army. The report criticizes the fact that since 1993 (with certain exceptions) the army has not undergone a single joint exercise involving all its different formations, and no joint training exists for ground and air forces.

Source: Slovakia 2000: A Global Report on the State of Society, (Institute for Public Affairs, 2000)

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