TIMELINE

The CDI Radio Case

1989 - Czechoslovak state radio and the Vienna-based firm Drehscheibe sign agreement for the latter to broadcast on 101.8 MHz for 20 hours a day serving parts of Slovakia, northern Austria and Vienna.
March 1990 - Broadcasts begin of channel named 'Rádio CD International'. Drehscheibe provides all advertising, programming etc. for broadcasts, which it prepares for SRo, rather than renting the frequency itself.
1993 - Newly formed Slovak Radio (SRo) takes over contract, now between SRo and firm named CDI Holding, which was the result of a fusion with Drehscheibe.

1989 - Czechoslovak state radio and the Vienna-based firm Drehscheibe sign agreement for the latter to broadcast on 101.8 MHz for 20 hours a day serving parts of Slovakia, northern Austria and Vienna.

March 1990 - Broadcasts begin of channel named 'Rádio CD International'. Drehscheibe provides all advertising, programming etc. for broadcasts, which it prepares for SRo, rather than renting the frequency itself.

1993 - Newly formed Slovak Radio (SRo) takes over contract, now between SRo and firm named CDI Holding, which was the result of a fusion with Drehscheibe.

July 16, 1993 - Emília Boldišová, then chair of the Council for Radio and Television Broadcasting, sends letter to SRo Director Vladimír Štefko, informing him that Rádio CDI is broadcasting illegally, and asking that SRo take CDI off the air within 30 days. Štefko replies that CDI is part of SRo's broadcast structure, and that the Council should not interfere.

October 2, 1993 - Telecom Ministry cuts CDI broadcasts 'for technical reasons'.

October 12, 1993 - Broadcasts resumed.

December 1993 - Broadcasts again cut, as parliament decides that SRo channel used by CDI will be sold to private station.

1994 - CDI complains to Strasbourg Court for Human Rights.

July 15, 1994 - New Telecom Minister Mikuláš Dzurinda intervenes in case, and after signing of new contract between CDI and Slovak Radio, broadcasts are resumed on 96.9 MHz.

June 1996 - Strasbourg Court works out peace agreement between CDI and Slovak go'vernment. CDI withdraws complaint.

September 3, 1996 - CDI signal again cut after Radio and TV Council rules that no license has ever been issued for CDI.

Spring 1997 - CDI submits another complaint to Strasbourg Court for Human Rights.

June 1998 - Austrian businessman Gunter Schuster submits suit against SRo in Bratislava I District Court.

July 1999 - CDI files suit against Slovak Telecom in Bratislava I District Court.

October 26, 1999 - Bratislava I District Court blocks trading in government shares in Slovak Telecom on basis of injunction filed by CDI. ST President Emil Hubinak calls decision of court judge Táňa Koprdová "unqualified".

March 2001 - CDI contacts ST to negotiate over promissory notes it obtained from Herold Tele Media.

April 2, 2001 - CDI files suit against ST for media campaign it alleges harms the reputation of businesses holding promissory notes.

April 2, 2001 - ST refuses to meet CDI's Gunter Schuster over 500 million crowns promissory note.

Compiled by Tom Nicholson from interviews and Slovak press.

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