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Around Slovakia

Slovak tennis stars compete internationally
Austrian police barred from questioning woman
Referendum peculiarities reported
WW II bomb shell found in sugar factory
Ten year-old boy kills his father
Jany Case: No fingerprints taken
New cathedral bells mark friendship


Henrieta Nagyová defeated Croat Iva Majoli in straight sets to take the WTA tournament in Malaysia.
photo: TASR

Nové Zámky
Slovak tennis stars compete internationally

Slovak tennis star Henrieta Nagyová of Nové Zámky won the sixth title of her young career Sunday, November 12 in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia by defeating Croat Iva Majoli 6-4 6-2 in the country's WTA tennis tournament. For the victory, the 21-year old Nagyová received $170,000.
On the same day, Slovak Dominik Hrbatý (ranked no. 18 in the world) lost in the finals of the ATP tournament in St. Petersburg to world no. 1 Russian Marat Safin 6-2 4-6 4-6.


Nové Zámky
Austrian police barred from questioning woman

The Austrian police were temporarily barred November 8 from officially questioning a Slovak woman about a car bomb that killed an Austrian businessman, Adolf Fuchs, in the Austrian town of Kindberg on October 30.
Arriving in the west-Slovak town of Nové Zámky, three officers found that they could not question the woman, Andrea S., as they had not asked for formal permission to do so from the Slovak investigator of the case under a bilateral treaty, Nové Zámky district police said.
According to Austrian media Fuchs had already filed a lawsuit against the Slovak woman over the alleged illegal blocking of property transfers in Slovakia.


Zemianske Sady
Referendum peculiarities reported

In Zemianske Sady, a village in western Slovakia, a middle-aged man, allegedly drunk, came to the local polling station Saturday November 11 to vote for a new Slovak president. When explained that he had come to a referendum on early elections and not a presidential election, he cast a vote anyway. Later in the day, the incident was repeated by a different man fitting the same description.
Further voting peculiarities were reported in other Slovak cities. In Banská Bystrica, 78 year-old Vincent Glako arrived on crutches to his local polling station without his ID card. Although officials offered to follow him home with the ballot box and let him vote there, Glako said that he would return because he needed the exercise. When Glako showed up later with only a health card, officials made an exception and let him vote anyway.
Voting in Vyškovce nad Ipľom was administered without the 23-year old vice-chair of the local referendum committee, who showed up drunk to the polling station and was later taken into custody after harassing a local female cook.


Rimavská Sobota
WW II bomb shell found in sugar factory

An unexploded World War II bomb shell, around 30 centimetres long, was found
among sugar beet at Gemercukor sugar factory in Rimavská Sobota on November 14.
"It is fortunate that the shell didn't go off when the sugar beet was loaded into the truck," the factory's director said. He added that this was the first time a shell had turned up at his factory, but that it wasn't unusual to find old WWII weapons during harvest in eastern Slovakia, especially around the Dukla pass region near the Polish border.
The shell was safely removed from the factory by bomb-disposal experts.


Studienka
Ten year-old boy kills his father

A ten year-old boy killed his father with a kitchen knife in the western Slovak village of Studienka November 14 after he found an admonishment for poor behaviour on the boy's school report card. The 10-year old had returned from school when his father, who had just returned from the local pub, punched him. Followed by the angry dad, the son ran out of the house shouting at his older sister to pass him a knife. After she refused he managed to get to the kitchen, take a knife and stab his father in the chest.
The victim was said to have been a frequent abuser of his wife and three children, both physically and mentally.


Bratislava
Jany Case: No fingerprints taken

Bratislava police investigators admitted November 6 that they may have a hard time fingering Saša Jány, modelling and fashion expert, for heroin smuggling after finding 59 packets of heroin in his car on June 7.
It has been revealed that the police on the scene failed to carry out a series of basic procedures, including taking fingerprints. So far the only evidence that the police have linking Jány to the crime is that the drugs were found in his car.
If convicted Jány could face between two and eight years in prison. The executive director of the Elite Model Look competition, he has told media that he is innocent.


Bratislava
New cathedral bells mark friendship

A holy mass given by Bratislava-Trnava archbishop Ján Sokol marked the return of five bells to the capital's St. Martin's Cathedral November 11. The installation of the new bells, hoisted to the belfry by crane, was seen as a symbol of friendship with Slovakia's neighbours, said Mayor of Bratislava Jozef Moravčík.
Moravčík thanked mayors of the neighbouring capitals for their gift of the bells, coming from Vienna, Kiev, Budapest, Prague and Warsaw. A commemorative plaque containing information on the original bells was also unveiled by the mayor at the cathedral.
The biggest of the new bells is the Vienna bell - named Maria Teresia - weighing 2.2 tons, while the smallest one, St. Vladimir comes from Kiev. Budapest donated the St. Margaret bell while Warsaw's gift was named after Pope John Paul II. Prague gave the St. Vojtech bell.
The bells of the Saint Martin Cathedral in Bratislava will ring on December 31 as a symbol of reconciliation, tolerance, and understanding in Central Europe. All the bells in the cathedral were broken during World War I except the largest, Wederin.

Compiled by Spectator Staff from TASR and SITA

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