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The Association of Contemporary Dance will over three evenings present eight dance performances from Slovak choreographers' workshops. The performances differ in mood and offer a variety of themes - from abstract impersonations of the search for meaning to a satirical picture of the 'unordinary common' things and situations which surround us all.
The aim of the Slovak presentations is to showcase the country's original works and to support the independent professionals of the field, most of whom suffer from poor exposure and scant venues to perform at. The dance performances presented this week will be a unique opportunity to enjoy the most recent developments of Slovak contemporary dance. Moreover, the audience will have the chance to experience a feeling that can sometimes only be expressed through motion.

Bratislava in Motion - Slovak contemporary dance

The Association of Contemporary Dance will over three evenings present eight dance performances from Slovak choreographers' workshops. The performances differ in mood and offer a variety of themes - from abstract impersonations of the search for meaning to a satirical picture of the 'unordinary common' things and situations which surround us all.

The aim of the Slovak presentations is to showcase the country's original works and to support the independent professionals of the field, most of whom suffer from poor exposure and scant venues to perform at. The dance performances presented this week will be a unique opportunity to enjoy the most recent developments of Slovak contemporary dance. Moreover, the audience will have the chance to experience a feeling that can sometimes only be expressed through motion.

Programme:

November 15

  • Do not Enter in Pairs (by Jozef Fruček)
  • A compilation of short dances
  • Together - premiere (by Marta Poláková)
  • Playful duet about two friends
  • Yes, Her (by Juraj Lech)
  • A man and his disturbing relationship with a 'beauty'
  • November 16

  • Half-moon Bear - premiere (by Petra Fornayová)
  • A solo performance based on an old Japanese story
  • Rules of the Game - premiere (by Anna Sedlačková)
  • A free adaptation of Julius Cortazár's story 'The ticket found in a pocket' captures themes such as, coincidence, manipulation, dependency, relationships and observation
  • See-through (by Jaroslav Viňarský)
  • A performance about the closeness of the present reality with the distance of childhood
  • November 17

  • Crack - premiere (by Lucia Holinová)
  • Ordinary stories of ordinary people living in one flat.
  • Today I Almost Met You - Slovak premiere (by Tomáš Danielis)
  • An improvisation based on a story written by 6-year old girl.
  • All performances will be staged at the Aréna Theatre on Viedenská cesta 10, on the Petržalka side of the Danube River nearby Nový most (New Bridge). Tickets for one evening cost 50-80 Sk, and can be bought at the Aréna Theatre, Tue-Fri 9:00-17:00, or at the Bratislava Information Centre on Klobučnícka 2, Mon-Fri 8:00-17:00. For more information call 6224 6875 or 6224 6886.

    Zuzana Habšudová

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