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Letters to the editor

Schuster law suit shows his true colours
Slovak alcohol consumption exaggerated
Slovak salesmanship hurting number of tourists
Change is not always for the better
More on what's in a Slovak name

Schuster law suit shows his true colours

Dear Editor,
Concerning your editorial ["Vanity, all is vanity: Said preacher of Schuster", Vol. 7 No. 25, June 25-July 1], to let this lawsuit [against Aleš Krátky, a journalist for the daily paper Nový Čas, who wrote a critical editorial on President Rudolf Schuster's state of the nation address - ed. note] go through would expose the communist past of Schuster and prove that Krátky was right in his assessment of the Slovak president.
From my point of view, Krátky should continue to expose the paranoid president. Schuster says he was never a Communist, that he was always a Catholic. How can we trust him? Krátky is right, and this trial will prove that Schuster is an egomaniac incapable of leading a country.
Krátky is the best reporter in Slovakia. The purpose of his editorial was to educate the general population. Mr. Krátky, please continue writing your editorials. Fight for the freedom of all citizens of Slovakia.

Geno


Slovak alcohol consumption exaggerated

Dear Editor,
Concerning your last Foreign Affairs column ["How to behave: Being nice to the nice", by Tom Nicholson, Vol. 7 No. 25, July 2-8], it seems a little exaggerated. I think there's no need to stay at someone's house in Slovakia if you feel uncomfortable. It's not a question of good manners to stay when your baby is crying.
Anyway, we don't drink as much as it seems. We just mix different alcohol a bit, which foreigners are not used to. That's the reason why most foreigners consider us to be heavy drinkers. But it's not true. It's just a question of use.

Matúš


Slovak salesmanship hurting number of tourists

Dear Editor,
I agree with your editorial ["Slovakia: Beautiful country, brutal salesmanship", Vol 7. No. 26, July 2-8]. I am Slovak and my husband is English. Every time we go home, which we do about three or four times a year, we land at Vienna airport and go off by car for another couple of hours just to get to Bratislava. It's about time that we were able to fly to Bratislava from Gatwick or Heathrow without a two hour journey through Austria.
Slovakia is a very beautiful country, and I'd bet anything that if we had a proper connection, we'd have more people visiting.

Lucia Newman
Britain


Change is not always for the better

Dear Editor,
It is a great pity that Slovakia will, like other countries before it, fall at the feet of globalisation ["New airline Sky Europe still trying to get off the ground", by Peter Barecz, Vol. 7 No. 27, July 2-8]. Of course, I understand that where there are potential markets, there are potential businesses queuing up to service them.
In the six years I have been in Slovakia, I have seen improvements, but change is not always for the better. Sky Europe is welcome, but should be greeted with caution. It will have no real competition, and thus can and probably will monopolise fares. The Slovak government should privatise Slovak Airlines now to create competition.
I wish Sky Europe good luck in their continuing negotiations, and hope that they think of the customer instead of the foreign investment and the companies they'll bring to Slovakia, for they alone can afford expensive air tickets.

Bryan Rylands


More on what's in a Slovak name

Dear Editor,
Regarding your article ["Swords versus rabbits: What's in a surname", by Tom Nicholson, Vol. 7 No. 25, June 25-July 1], in an old book called Urbar, from the 16th century, I found a listing of serfs in a village that were called Libertini, meaning, tax free. They did not have to pay taxes or any other contributions. They bought their freedom from the landlord. They all carried the surname Slobodník, which means the same: a free man.

Vladimír Bohinc

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