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The word 'mankind' evokes different images for each individual. Understandably, human beings have long been a provocative topic for art, enjoying a wide range of unique presentations.
On September 5, the Bratislava Town Gallery opens an art exhibition titled 'Commom Denominator', showing various ways in which human beings can be represented through art. Held at Mirbachov Palác, the exhibition compiles domestic art from the 20th century depicting the phenomenon of mankind. The exhibition reflects different artists' individual interpretations through varied techniques.
The pieces are divided into two groups: the first is dated from the first half of the 20th century and is characterised by realist images of human beings. The works are dominated by portraits and self-portraits.


"What isn't in one's thoughts doesn't exist" (above) is on display at the Common Denominator exhibit.
photo: Martin Marenčin

Exhibition: Where Present Meets Past

The word 'mankind' evokes different images for each individual. Understandably, human beings have long been a provocative topic for art, enjoying a wide range of unique presentations.

On September 5, the Bratislava Town Gallery opens an art exhibition titled 'Commom Denominator', showing various ways in which human beings can be represented through art. Held at Mirbachov Palác, the exhibition compiles domestic art from the 20th century depicting the phenomenon of mankind. The exhibition reflects different artists' individual interpretations through varied techniques.

The pieces are divided into two groups: the first is dated from the first half of the 20th century and is characterised by realist images of human beings. The works are dominated by portraits and self-portraits.

The second classification presents works from the second half of the century and focuses not on direct images of people, but rather on the abstract 'traces' they leave behind. Termed by organisers as 'object art', it uses images that show what man seeks and finds, without revealing his physical presence.

The exhibition offers other works reflecting humankind's inner self, literally. Images taken from x-rays, sonographs and tomographs show the physical insides of the body, while abstract 'expressionist' works point out the differences between man and woman.

The main part of the exhibition is a collection of modern pieces dating from the 1990's, most of which have never before been exhibited in Bratislava.

The exhibition is held on the ground floor and second floor of Mirbachov Palác on Františkánske námestie 11, just off the Hlavné námestie (Main Square). It is open daily except Mondays from 10:00 to 18:00. Admission ranges from 20 to 40 Slovak crowns. The ground floor exhibition runs till October 1, while the second floor show continues till November 5.

For further information contact Jana Geržová, the exhibition curator, at 5443 1556.

Zuzana Habšudová

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