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Top Pick: French Film Festival

Bratislava will host the International Francophone Film Festival for the second time from March 15 to 22. A selection of 30 films from 11 French-speaking countries around the world will be featured at Bratislava's Hviezda cinema.
Between films, lively conversations and debates are sure to occur in the theatre's cafe, as more than 10 French directors, actors and producers hosting the festival will mingle with the crowds, providing an unusually intimate movie-going experience. Slovak or French language skills are required as all films will be shown in French with Slovak sub-titles.

Bratislava will host the International Francophone Film Festival for the second time from March 15 to 22. A selection of 30 films from 11 French-speaking countries around the world will be featured at Bratislava's Hviezda cinema.

Between films, lively conversations and debates are sure to occur in the theatre's cafe, as more than 10 French directors, actors and producers hosting the festival will mingle with the crowds, providing an unusually intimate movie-going experience. Slovak or French language skills are required as all films will be shown in French with Slovak sub-titles.

Last time around, in November 1998, the French film festival received a very positive response in Bratislava. "I think Slovaks are particularly sensitive to cultural diversity, which is what these films portray," said Michel Gies of the French Institute in Bratislava, one of the festival organisers.

While all the films are shown in the French language, other common threads are hard to come by as the films represent several varying cultures and ideas. Furthermore, festival organisers have taken pains to provide viewers with both commercial and non-commercial films.

Friday March 17 promises to be a special night for the festival as French film enthusiasts will be treated to an all night movie binge. Starting at 16:00, films will play through the night till sunrise at 7:00. Fortunately, breakfast is included in the price of a ticket.

Besides France, Belgium and Switzerland, there will also be films from other more far-flung French speaking countries such as Canada, Egypt, Senegal and Burkina Faso.

For a complete programme of films, drop by the French Institute on Hlavné Námestie (Main Square). Tickets can be bought at Hviezda cinema on Námestie 1 mája (May 1 Square). Ticket prices: 35 Sk for afternoon shows, 50 Sk for evening shows, and 120 Sk for the Film-night. One ticket covering the whole festival costs 300 Sk.

For more information please call the French Institute at 5934 7777, or visit their web-site: www.france.sk.

Andrea Chalupová

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