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Election law

The political inferno ignited by Prime Minister Vladimír Mečiar's use of Presidential powers had scarcely abated before the government unveiled a controversial new election law proposal on March 5, engulfing Mečiar's ruling coalition in a fresh wave of criticism.

The government maintains that the law is designed to restore order and consensus in Parliament by reducing the number of small parties presently fighting to secure narrow interests. The Interior Ministry announced on March 16 that 88 separate parties and movements were currently registered.

But the opposition claims the measure will virtually outlaw coalitions, discriminate against independent candidates and give an overwhelming advantage to Mečiar's HZDS.

Vol. 4 No. 6, Mar. 26-Apr. 8, 1998

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