Union rally damns government policy

Trade unions held a 5,000-strong rally in Bratislava to protest against a proposed hike in gas prices as well as the wider national economic situation.
Led by their bosses on October 17, they used trumpets, rattles, drums, sirens and megaphones to express their dissatisfaction with government's handling of unemployment and living standards in Slovakia.
"The government ignores us. We can't be sitting in an ivory tower, but have to express our dissatisfaction. That's the only way to bring about change," said Miroslav Juriga 43, the union head from Slovak ferroalloys producer OFZ in northern Slovakia, as the rally brought city centre traffic to a standstill.


Union leaders march through Bratislava.
photo: Ján Svrček

Trade unions held a 5,000-strong rally in Bratislava to protest against a proposed hike in gas prices as well as the wider national economic situation.

Led by their bosses on October 17, they used trumpets, rattles, drums, sirens and megaphones to express their dissatisfaction with government's handling of unemployment and living standards in Slovakia.

"The government ignores us. We can't be sitting in an ivory tower, but have to express our dissatisfaction. That's the only way to bring about change," said Miroslav Juriga 43, the union head from Slovak ferroalloys producer OFZ in northern Slovakia, as the rally brought city centre traffic to a standstill.

The meeting was also called to protest against the frozen dialogue between government representatives and union umbrella group KOZ in the aftermath of the planned increase in natural gas prices.

The KOZ bosses and representatives of the AZZZ employers association left a September meeting of the 'tripartite council', where the state conducts formal negotiations with labour and business, after turning down a government proposal to increase gas prices by 20%.

In the end, the government did not approve the price hikes after the leftist SDĽ and SOP parties vetoed the proposal in cabinet.


Unions are inflamed by proposed gas price hikes.
photo: Ján Svrček

KOZ representatives accused the government of breaking an agreement reached at one of the earlier meetings, which did not envisage a further increase in gas prices this year, as well as violating a law governing tripartite discussions.

Moreover, they refused to take part in this week's tripartite meetings proposed by Prime Minister Mikuláš Dzurinda.

As the unions began to assemble in the suburbs of the capital, Dzurinda branded the policies of the labour leadership "two-faced", saying they were more interested in gestures than negotiations and had ignored his proposals for the meeting.

But KOZ head Ivan Saktor, who led the strikers towards to the Government Offices said: "On the contrary, the government has ignored agreements which were reached in the past and wants to blame it on us."

The strikers, who had come from different corners of Slovakia, said they were marching to protest serious national problems, not simply to complain of legal breaches.

University professor Anna Krakovická, 46, said: "People are not paid well, Slovakia is still fighting a high unemployment rate, young people can't find jobs. This is why we are here.

"I myself don't have such problems. But I think that even people who don't have a specific reason to be here should come and support such rallies," she added.

Krakovická was not the only one at the rally who had little personal reason to come.

Standing at the back of the rally square, Agriculture Minister Pavol Koncoš of the SDĽ said he had come to learn about the demands of trade unions "at first hand."

"I'm curious to see how the meeting goes. The government's session ended and I decided to come here," he said.

"I know many union bosses, and I don't think their policies are two-faced. I fully understand their demands with regards to the increase in the gas prices."

Top stories

News digest: Slovakia spent €40 million in the past three months to treat Covid patients

Slovakia supports Poland and the Baltic states in their efforts to protect their border with Belarus. The European Commission has launched legal action against five countries, including Slovakia.


3 h
Illustrative stock photo

Mandatory vaccination in compliance with the Constitution. Even Fico extended it in the past (Q&A)

The Sme daily prepares answers to questions on mandatory vaccination in Slovakia.


1. dec
Some schools in Slovakia have been closed.

Schools in Bratislava will switch to remote learning

Only kindergartens and grades one through four will remain open.


1. dec
Skryť Close ad