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Top Pick: Pink Drink mixed by lesbian artists

They're both 25. Both openly gay. They've both studied art. And they're both determined to fight prejudice against women.
Bea Gálová and Paula Chrenková have a lot in common, but their mediums of expression and artistic philosophies are strikingly different. While Gálová paints with computer programmes, and uses only women as models, Chrenková crafts modern sculptures and finds inspiration in both sexes and in inatimate objects.
"To me a woman is a goddess, I perceive her as a wife," said Gálová. "I try to bring out the radiance of her spirit through the expression on her face. Virtual techniques help me achieve this."


Sculptures by Paula Chrenková.

They're both 25. Both openly gay. They've both studied art. And they're both determined to fight prejudice against women.

Bea Gálová and Paula Chrenková have a lot in common, but their mediums of expression and artistic philosophies are strikingly different. While Gálová paints with computer programmes, and uses only women as models, Chrenková crafts modern sculptures and finds inspiration in both sexes and in inatimate objects.

"To me a woman is a goddess, I perceive her as a wife," said Gálová. "I try to bring out the radiance of her spirit through the expression on her face. Virtual techniques help me achieve this."

"My works are asexual." said Chrenková. "I want to be myself. I don't want to be identified with any group."

The works of both women are on display in a new exhibition, Pink Drink, opened last week in the Bratislava gallery Buryzone Club. Pink Drink includes eight computer-generated paintings by Gálová, each depicting a woman with distinct emotions on her face. Chrenková's seven pink and white sculptures are three-dimensional imprints taken from a discarded doll she found on a street in Bratislava.

Gálová recently discovered the computer air-brush technique when she started a new job as a graphic designer. She had been a classical painter, but in her new office she learned that a computer could improve her work. "I used to hate computers. But with their help I found my own style. The computer radiates. And it enables my pictures to be reproduced in many forms, such as email and print," she said.


Computer generated paintings by Bea Gálová.

Formerly a water-colour painter, Chrenková recently laid down her paint and brush to cast the images of a plastic doll she found in a garbage heap. She says the sculptures express the life and death of the doll.

"I find something, I get an idea, I develop it," she said.

While Chrenková and Gálová are different as artists, they agree on one thing: women make better objects for painting and sculpting than men.

"Men are uniform, women are aesthetic," they said, more or less in unison. "When we walk down the street, women stick out of the crowd. They are more colorful."

The exhibition runs at Buryzone club on Čajakova 11 (behind YMCA cinema) until November 8. Open Wed-Thu 14:00-22:00 and Fri 14:00-24:00. www.buryzone.sk

By Zuzana Habšudová

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