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Film festival breaks monotony

A new film festival called 'European Film Days' will give Bratislava audiences a welcome break from the American movies that dominate Slovak theatres. Beginning on Sunday, November 8, the festival will screen 24 'non-commercial' films from 18 countries in its seven-day run - all with English subtitles.
The festival is supported by the European Commission Delegation in Slovakia, the Ministry of Culture and many others. Films will be shown at the Mladosť and Tatra cinemas in downtown Bratislava; many of them have never been seen in Slovakia before, and were selected for the festival by national cultural institutions across Europe.


The Greek movie The Passion, 1995, plays on November 14 at Tatra Cinema in downtown Bratislava.
photo: Courtesy of the festival comiteé

A new film festival called 'European Film Days' will give Bratislava audiences a welcome break from the American movies that dominate Slovak theatres. Beginning on Sunday, November 8, the festival will screen 24 'non-commercial' films from 18 countries in its seven-day run - all with English subtitles.

The festival is supported by the European Commission Delegation in Slovakia, the Ministry of Culture and many others. Films will be shown at the Mladosť and Tatra cinemas in downtown Bratislava; many of them have never been seen in Slovakia before, and were selected for the festival by national cultural institutions across Europe.

"The main idea is to serve the kind of audience which has a taste for European films, as well as Slovaks who want to learn about Europe," said Michel Gies, director of the French Institute.

Festival entries include films like the Estonian All My Lenins (1997), a pseudo-historical drama about the events leading up to the 1917 October Revolution, the hit French comedy One Idiot for Dinner, (1998), or the Italian The Turkish Bath (1998) in which Francesco inherits a bath from Turkey.

Slovak entries include some of the country's most popular movies of the 1990's, such as The Garden (1995), directed by Martin Šulík, and Paper Heads (1996), a documentary about events after November 1989, directed by Dušan Hanák.

Only a few films will be simultaneously translated into Slovak, but all of them have English subtitles. Film showings held daily at 18:00 and 20:30. For schedule and more information contact the festival's main organisers: the French Institute, at Tel.: 59 34 77 77, the Italian Institute, at Tel.: 07-54 41 25 85, and the Spanish Embassy, at Tel.: 07-54 41 57 25.

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