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Lexa's lawyers to lodge human rights complaint


Lawyers representing ex-secret service boss Ivan Lexa, shown above several days after being released from pre-trial custody, say their client has been ill since his release from prison.
photo: Marek Veľček-SME

Bratislava - The lawyers of former SIS boss Ivan Lexa announced September 22 in Bratislava that they will lodge a complaint with the European Court of Human Rights in Strasbourg, France against the Slovak Constitutional Court for a violation of their client's human rights. Charges against Lexa for his involvement in the 1995 abduction of Michal Kováč Jr. are pending, but his lawyers insist that his prosecution is illegal because he was given parliamentary amnesty last year by out-going Prime Minister Vladimír Mečiar.

"When the case is over - and we think it will conclude without any sentence being passed against our client - who will pay for this dog show?" asked Juraj Trokan, one of Lexa's lawyers. Lexa was unable to attend the press conference because he has been ill since his July 19 release from prison, Trokan said.

Lexa was arrested on April 15 and spent over three months in prison before being freed by a Bratislava Regional Court decision. Any money awarded Lexa as compensation for his violated human rights will be donated to charity, his lawyers said.

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