Letter to the Editor: Slovakia no more corrupt than anywhere else

Dear Editor

With accusations flying to and fro about corruption at the moment, it seems that most of your readers, and indeed you yourselves have forgotten one thing - under the previous government, all contracts between buyers of property and the FNM were legal. Perhaps some contracts were immoral, but that is not the point.

As Mr. Ernest Valko pointed out in his interview with Mr. Nicholson [Vol. 5 No. 27, July 12-18], the law has so many holes that people can jump through it and avoid criminal prosecution. Why has it taken this government eight months to begin to think about closing some of these holes? Is it because they too wish to use them?

Slovakia's level of corruption is no different than that of any other country in the world. If there is a difference it is that Slovaks are not as sophisticated in avoiding detection because of their relative inexperience with corruption.

What Slovakia and its present government ought to do is learn to be more discreet and sophisticated at hiding corruption, lessons that other countries have already mastered.

I hope they are successful.

Name and address withheld by request

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