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Café Kút - Funky furnishings and tunes draw a hip crowd

Young, good-looking, trendy students in the evenings and men puffing cigars through subdued business meetings in the mornings: that is the clientele of Cafe Kút, a newly opened and much needed café in the centre of the Old Town near Michalská street. If you are tired of all those "cool" people at nearby café "U Anjelov", exhausted by the thought of more jazz music or can't face another evening of watching local machos (so-called businessmen) whiling away the hours with their mobile phones in one hand and keys to expensive cars in the other, then this might just be your new place to hang-out.
Situated just outside the entrance to Restaurant Prašná bašta (another one of our favorites) and owned by the same family, the café is tucked away in a small corner (kút) from which it gets its name.


Café Kút - a new meeting point in the Old Town of Bratislava
photo: Soňa Bellušová

Address: Zámočnícka 11, Bratislava
Tel.: 07-54 43 49 57
Reservations: Yes
Prices: $
Credit Cards: No
Recommended? Yes
English menu: No
Hours: 8:00-23:00

Young, good-looking, trendy students in the evenings and men puffing cigars through subdued business meetings in the mornings: that is the clientele of Cafe Kút, a newly opened and much needed café in the centre of the Old Town near Michalská street. If you are tired of all those "cool" people at nearby café "U Anjelov", exhausted by the thought of more jazz music or can't face another evening of watching local machos (so-called businessmen) whiling away the hours with their mobile phones in one hand and keys to expensive cars in the other, then this might just be your new place to hang-out.

Situated just outside the entrance to Restaurant Prašná bašta (another one of our favorites) and owned by the same family, the café is tucked away in a small corner (kút) from which it gets its name. Entering the café is at first like stepping into a red-painted box due to its red coloured floor, and Spanish terracotta-coloured walls. A small wooden bar on the right displays a few glass trays of cold pasta, olives, sardines and sweet cakes. Passing this first corridor, you can sit either on couple of bar chairs or in one of two rooms (one smoking and one non-smoking) viewing the lovely outdoor yard of Prašná Bašta .

The two rooms are separated by a table with butterflies under the glass. Elsewhere, wooden tables in an antique style, framed pictures, old sofas and shaded lamps add to the pleasant interior, which was designed by young Bratislava artists and students of The Academy of Fine Arts. Above each table, a small lamp sends out a reddish glow, adding to the monochrome atmosphere.

Apart from the cold "little somethings to eat" and cakes, the café serves a wide choice of drinks. With 11 kinds of whisky, such as Jameson's Irish for 65 Sk or eight-year-old Wild Turkey for 75 Sk, Café Kút is not only a place for cappuccino (35 Sk). Other options include glasses of Slovak wines or bottled Beaujolais, 1997 (345 Sk). Topping the price list is a sparkling wine called Pipper for a whopping 1,450 Sk. Beer fans can order six kinds, including non-alcoholic beer Clausthaler for 26 Sk and good old Guinness for 50 Sk. Girlish smooth drinks include egg liqueur for 30 Sk or Bailey's for 60 Sk.

Ever-trendy Absinthe can be had for 60 Sk, and the drink list goes on with classic Martinis for 45 Sk, Absolut Vodka for 45 Sk, Calvados Boulevard for 85 Sk and Slovak "hard stuff" like Slivovica for 45 Sk. Your wine can be boiled for an extra 5 crowns and the juices menu includes strawberry.

Perhaps the best thing about Cafe Kút is that it is actually possible to have a discussion with your friends there without the ever-present pounding techno or dance floor music accompaniment. The hip music selection at Kút includes the Transpotting and Pulp Fiction soundtracks, as well as some acid jazz. Take it from us: this is place is a good choice for coffee and modern sounds.

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