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"Shocking" murder testimony

Bratislava

"First, we tied Miroslav Madunický and Jaroslav Pastorek together and then we started beating them," said Viliam Feigler, 39, in his testimony during the trial involving the brutal murders of Madunický and Pastorek by himself and three other homless people, Ján Szabó, 32 of Bratislava, Peter , 20 of Šamorín, and Božena Mlčová, 27, of Trnava. The murders had taken place on July 14, 1997.

Feigler further described how his accomplice, "Miss Mlčová", had beaten Madunický, 27, with a plank on the head, burnt his pubic hair with torches made out of newspaper, dropped hot wax on his back and poured pure alcohol, mixed with "hot chilli peppers or drugs" she had found in trash containers, down his throat. After several days of the torture, she stabbed the victim, finally killing him.

"I hate it when somebody offends my deceased father, which he did, and therefore I stabbed him," Miss Mlčová said in court.

The double murder had taken place in an abandoned house on Lamačská Street in Bratislava. Under such privacy, the accused were able to torture the victims, starving them except for alcohol, beating them with their hands and sticks, sprinkling hot coals on their stomachs, cutting off their sexual organs and eventually murdering them.

Mlčová confessed to killing Madunický but denied partaking in any of the torture, accusing her three male accomplices who, in turn, accused her. If convicted, they face prison terms of 12-15 years or the "exceptional punishment" of 12-25 years.

The prosecuting lawyer stated the crime was incomparable to any in Slovak history in terms cruelty, and added that he was "shocked" that a woman was one of the main initiators.

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