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Small multi-purpose complex mired in financial bog

Ružinov is one of Bratislava's most lively suburbs when it comes to construction of new apartments and small multi-purpose complexes. One such project, that has been in the works since 1991, will finally be finished by Bratislava-based Renos construction company this year. But the seven year story of this promising construction has so far been a story of failure.
The complex is located on the corner of Kaštieľska and Mierová, about 200 meters from the Economy Ministry and within Mierová street's public housing project, a site which boosts the complex's attractions to both business and private users.

Ružinov is one of Bratislava's most lively suburbs when it comes to construction of new apartments and small multi-purpose complexes. One such project, that has been in the works since 1991, will finally be finished by Bratislava-based Renos construction company this year. But the seven year story of this promising construction has so far been a story of failure.

The complex is located on the corner of Kaštieľska and Mierová, about 200 meters from the Economy Ministry and within Mierová street's public housing project, a site which boosts the complex's attractions to both business and private users.

The bottom four floors of the ten-floor complex have been designed for business use. The first two floors are joined together, offering 1,027 square meters of office space. The third and the fourth floor are separated, and each cover 477 square meters. The price for one floor is 8.7 million Sk, and Renos plans to sell each to a single buyer.

The problem, though, has always been the unfinished apartments on the top six floors. The government cut off financial support for apartment construction in January 1993. "It was a great present from the new Slovak Republic [established on January 1, 1993], to stop financial support of apartment construction," said Milan Vajda, spokesman of Bratislava's Mayor.

Without state support, City Hall decided to sell the project in 1994. "There was great interest in [the business potential of] this building, but we decided to sell it as soon as possible, because construction was not going at the right pace, and it was better for a private company to continue in the project," Vajda said.

Same old story

Renos took over construction in 1995, but from the very beginning had problems meeting deadlines. The 12 three-room and 18 single-room apartments were to be finished in October 1997, but the way things look now, will not be completed until the end of June this year.

The apartments have already been bought in advance by their future inhabitants, some of whom are not overly optimistic. "I do not believe that they will keep the June deadline," said one owner who wished to remain anonymous. "I would not put my hand in the fire for it."

But Renos management is confident that the June deadline will be met. "The municipal construction authority promised to check the building and issue their approval even before the building is completely finished, so that people could move into their flats sooner," said Anton Wolec, Renos's construction director. He added that finishing the complex depends mostly on the company's abilities and the interest of potential buyers of commercial and administrative space. "It may take two months, or even two years (to finish)," said Wolec.

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