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Labour Code amended again

Parliament on March 20 approved several changes to a Labour Code amendment that is set to take effect April 1. The changes, which raise caps on overtime work and allow part time contracts, meet the main demands of employers.

Employees will now be able to work a maximum of 58 hours a week at one job or a combination of jobs, while employers will be allowed to hire on the basis of part-time contracts for up to 20 hours a week. The alterations, say employers, will allow them to react more quickly to market changes.

In other amendments, employers got less than they had been demanding. Job positions which are cancelled can now be re-created after three months rather than six; employees have the right to a half-hour break after six hours rather than four; and some professions will be allowed to work weekends.

The updated Code must now be signed by the president and published in the Collection of Laws before April 1 to be valid.

Compiled by Tom Nicholson from press reports.
The Slovak Spectator cannot vouch for the accuracy of the information presented in its Flash News postings.

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