Spectator on facebook

Spectator on facebook

Reader Feedback: Re: Beneš debate 'dangerous', By Tom Nicholson, Vol. 8 No. 11, March 25-31

I would like to focus on the issue of human rights. In the last 2-3 weeks I have been a frequent reader of the Uj Szó [Hungarian-language Slovak daily paper] online. I learned a lot about the fate, suffering end even mass killing of Hungarians in Slovakia after the second world war (one of them took place near a railway station) by 'peaceful' Slovaks.

The article that saddened me the most was entitled 'Speaking Hungarian on a bus'. It was about a granny and her seven-year-old grandson boarding a bus in the Slovak capital and speaking Hungarian. The granny looked around very frightened, even though the bus was half empty. She spoke in a low voice, fearful that a Slovak might bark at her for speaking Hungarian. She was greatly relieved when she realised that she did not have to fear the man close to her because he was also a Hungarian.

This simple story took place in 2002 in central Europe, and speaks volumes about Hungarians as second class citizens in Slovakia. I see similarities between the fate of Hungarians in Slovakia and the fate of Albanians in Macedonia. They are both second class citizens in their own countries. The Albanians, however, got tired of promises last year and took up arms. Solana, Prodi and Verheugen stopped laughing and realised that something was rotten in Macedonia.

What is needed in Slovakia is to show those same bureaucrats that something is rotten in this country as well.

Toni

Top stories

LGBTI people in the regions: We change people’s minds

Bratislava will dress up in rainbow colours this August again, for the seventh time. This will be for the Bratislava Dúhový Pride diversity festival. But the colours of the rainbow are less bright in the regions,…

Slovakia’s LGBTI community seeks to expand their rights.

Things that make us different also make us stronger

On August 19, a rainbow flag will fly over the US Embassy in Bratislava to represent the firm commitment of the United States to defending the human rights of LGBTI people, writes Ambassador Sterling.

The rainbow flag flew over the US Embassy in Bratislava in 2016.

Blog: 5 things you should do on your visit to the north of Slovakia Photo

Here is a list of tips by an experienced tour guide - including things you have probably not tried before.

Bratislava growing high Photo

High-rise buildings sprouting up in Bratislava

Visualisation of the future skyline of Bratislava