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Multifunctional building slated for Ružinov

Slowly but surely, developers are starting to cater to the needs of the huge populations living in Bratislava's communist-era housing complexes. One of the newest projects attempting to add some sorely-needed services and character is planned for the Ružinov district built during the late 60s and early 70s.
The investor, Martinák s.r.o. Bratislava, plans to start construction on a multifunctional center on Ružinovská ulica next year. The 270 million Sk ($9 million) complex will combine retail, office, and residential space - all of which the investor intends to sell. Prices are projected at 20,000 Sk/m2 for residential space and higher for office and retail space.
The 17,285 square-meter complex, on the site of a current parking lot beside a Benzinol gas station, will also house 114 underground parking places. Authored by architects Milan Kiaček and Pavol Komár, the center comprises three buildings and a glass passageway.

Slowly but surely, developers are starting to cater to the needs of the huge populations living in Bratislava's communist-era housing complexes. One of the newest projects attempting to add some sorely-needed services and character is planned for the Ružinov district built during the late 60s and early 70s.

The investor, Martinák s.r.o. Bratislava, plans to start construction on a multifunctional center on Ružinovská ulica next year. The 270 million Sk ($9 million) complex will combine retail, office, and residential space - all of which the investor intends to sell. Prices are projected at 20,000 Sk/m2 for residential space and higher for office and retail space.

The 17,285 square-meter complex, on the site of a current parking lot beside a Benzinol gas station, will also house 114 underground parking places. Authored by architects Milan Kiaček and Pavol Komár, the center comprises three buildings and a glass passageway. The 11 retail outlets on the 2,400 square-meter ground floor will have entrances both from outside and from the passage. The investor, Vladimír Martinák, said that the ground floor will include a McDonald's restaurant with a drive-through.

The second and third floors will include 4,200 m2 of office space. In an effort to maximize flexibility, Martinák said, the offices will be arranged into office "cells" 90 m2 each, which can be combined with each other. He said he expects the office space to attract the interest of mid-sized Slovak firms that are seeking to buy rather than rent their own offices.

Above the offices will be 5,500 m2 of flats across four floors. Martinák said the original proposal called for 56 flats, with 20 five-rooms flats of about 130 m2 each. But, he added, he has found more interest in three or four-rooms flats.

Efforts are being made to make those flats as comfortable as possible for their residents - in stark contrast to the pre-fabricated panel apartment buildings that dominate the area. "A cornice of the building will provide protection against noise," Komár said. "Tall trees will be preserved to enhance the view."

Martinák said he wants to start construction in early 1998 and finish it within 18 months. He is financing initial construction with his own sources, but expects to use loans and funds from sales for future stages of construction.

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