Spectator on facebook

Spectator on facebook

Letter to the Editor: Hainburg should respect Slovaks, not threaten

Dear Sir,

Recently as I was passing through your town, I stopped briefly for some refreshments at one of your cafes. Imagine my surprise to find a paper with some Slovak writing and a statement in German, which I later discovered was a parking fine. I read neither Slovak nor German.

The area in which I parked (in front of the church) did not display a visible international symbol designating it as a No Parking Area.

The car I drive has Bratislava license plates. I noticed that the girl who was distributing the parking tickets did not place any on Austrian cars.

Austrian people come to Slovakia very frequently to take advantage of lower prices in restaurants, pubs, shops and hair-dressers, to name but a few. I have never noticed Slovak officials fining Austrian cars, even when they were illegally parked! Slovaks consider Austrian citizens and Austria as good neighbors, and treat them accordingly, with politeness and respect. My question is, why are Slovaks not accorded the same courtesies? Do you consider them third class citizens?

I look upon your parking policy as discriminatory against your Slovak neighbors. And the Slovak note, after I had it translated, is nothing less than threatening. This does not bode well for friendly relations between two countries adjacent to each other.

Vienna, being an international city, and Austria, owe the world international considerations, namely, signs in important services must be posted in the three international languages - German, English, and French. Because you have not done that, you have made me feel like a criminal - I broke your law. You have also made me feel that the Austrian people are not as generous as I had always believed them to be until now.

Respectfully yours, Anne Matheson

[This letter was originally sent to the mayor of Hainburg, Austria.]

Top stories

She faced Russian tanks in 1968. Today, she protests again Photo

There are no tanks pointing at us today, says Mária Homolková, who joined protests in SNP Square once again in March 2018 to secure a better life for her grandchildren.

August 21st, 1968: The Warsaw Pact troops, led by the Soviet army, invaded Czechoslovakia .

Kiska appoints Pellegrini cabinet

The president approved the new government, despite some reservations. The new PM promises to investigate the murder of the journalist and his fiancée.

Peter Pellegrini's government

Organisers cancelled the Bratislava protest

But they are ready to monitor the steps of the new government closely and return to streets when necessary.

Andrej Kiska met with the representatives of the For a Decent Slovakia initiative.

What Easter events will be held in Bratislava?

There will be Easter concerts, markets as well as workshops and birdwatching

Easter traditions in Slovakia.