Government misses a chance to clarify its position

I was disappointed to read the empty accusations of The Slovak Spectator by Ľudmila Buláková, Spokeswoman of the Slovak Government, (Vol. 3 #13 - July 3-16, 1997) as the response to the Open Letter to the Prime Minister.
As a reader of this newspaper, I believe I deserve better information from the head of the government after the fiasco of the so-called referendum. I have learned nothing about his views and I do not have access to the programs quoted in Ms. Buláková's reply. I was genuinely looking forward to an informative reply to the open letter. Instead, I learned that the government can not take fair questions and immediately accuses anybody who does not line up with their views of aggressive, accusational and one-sided politics.

I was disappointed to read the empty accusations of The Slovak Spectator by Ľudmila Buláková, Spokeswoman of the Slovak Government, (Vol. 3 #13 - July 3-16, 1997) as the response to the Open Letter to the Prime Minister.

As a reader of this newspaper, I believe I deserve better information from the head of the government after the fiasco of the so-called referendum. I have learned nothing about his views and I do not have access to the programs quoted in Ms. Buláková's reply. I was genuinely looking forward to an informative reply to the open letter. Instead, I learned that the government can not take fair questions and immediately accuses anybody who does not line up with their views of aggressive, accusational and one-sided politics.

In contrast, I found The Slovak Spectator well balanced, giving a voice to the opposition right along with the government coalition representatives. It is more than one can say about any of the Slovak newspapers I had a chance to read in Slovakia.

I think that the government would serve its interests better if it used every opportunity to explain itself to the English readers, instead of hiding behind meaningless accusations.


Jay Zednik,
Tokyo, Japan

Get daily Slovak news directly to your inbox

Top stories

News digest: Who will take the swabs?

The government offers hundreds of euros to health care staff for testing. Curfew ends on Saturday for some. Take a look at testing sites and more.

PM Igor Matovič helped with testing in Tvrdošín.

People with negative tests can go to hairdresser or outdoor terraces

Those with a negative test result will have to follow rules introduced on October 15.

Companies fear drop in demand for their products and services the most

International chambers of commerce asked companies about their current situation as well as expectations.

Companies implemented anti-coronavirus measures.

The big testing: When and where to show up, and what if I don't want to? (FAQ)

Here is what we know about the practicalities of the nationwide testing so far. Testing also applies to foreigners and diplomats in Slovakia.

Pilot testing in Bardejov