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Government misses a chance to clarify its position

I was disappointed to read the empty accusations of The Slovak Spectator by Ľudmila Buláková, Spokeswoman of the Slovak Government, (Vol. 3 #13 - July 3-16, 1997) as the response to the Open Letter to the Prime Minister.
As a reader of this newspaper, I believe I deserve better information from the head of the government after the fiasco of the so-called referendum. I have learned nothing about his views and I do not have access to the programs quoted in Ms. Buláková's reply. I was genuinely looking forward to an informative reply to the open letter. Instead, I learned that the government can not take fair questions and immediately accuses anybody who does not line up with their views of aggressive, accusational and one-sided politics.

I was disappointed to read the empty accusations of The Slovak Spectator by Ľudmila Buláková, Spokeswoman of the Slovak Government, (Vol. 3 #13 - July 3-16, 1997) as the response to the Open Letter to the Prime Minister.

As a reader of this newspaper, I believe I deserve better information from the head of the government after the fiasco of the so-called referendum. I have learned nothing about his views and I do not have access to the programs quoted in Ms. Buláková's reply. I was genuinely looking forward to an informative reply to the open letter. Instead, I learned that the government can not take fair questions and immediately accuses anybody who does not line up with their views of aggressive, accusational and one-sided politics.

In contrast, I found The Slovak Spectator well balanced, giving a voice to the opposition right along with the government coalition representatives. It is more than one can say about any of the Slovak newspapers I had a chance to read in Slovakia.

I think that the government would serve its interests better if it used every opportunity to explain itself to the English readers, instead of hiding behind meaningless accusations.


Jay Zednik,
Tokyo, Japan

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