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CHUTES AND LADDERS

Top swap at accounting firm

Robert Wood, 48, is leaving his position as managing partner of Deloitte & Touche's office in Bratislava to head up the international accounting and management consulting firm's office in Belgrade. Wood succeeds Danko Djunic, who was recently appointed minister for economic affairs in the Yugoslav government.
"It has been a pleasure to work in a country as gracious as Slovakia and to assist our clients as they make the transition to a market economy," said Wood, who has been working in Slovakia since July 1992 and has been managing partner at the office since January 1994.
Wood was born in Florida but went over a few state lines to attend the University of North Carolina, where he obtained a bachelors degree in economics and a masters degree in finance.



Robert Wood, 48, is leaving his position as managing partner of Deloitte & Touche's office in Bratislava to head up the international accounting and management consulting firm's office in Belgrade. Wood succeeds Danko Djunic, who was recently appointed minister for economic affairs in the Yugoslav government.

"It has been a pleasure to work in a country as gracious as Slovakia and to assist our clients as they make the transition to a market economy," said Wood, who has been working in Slovakia since July 1992 and has been managing partner at the office since January 1994.

Wood was born in Florida but went over a few state lines to attend the University of North Carolina, where he obtained a bachelors degree in economics and a masters degree in finance.

Wood, who is a Certified Public Accountant (CPA), has been working with Deloitte & Touche for fifteen years now and is a partner with both Deloitte & Touche United States and Deloitte & Touche Central Europe.

He is also a member of the management committee of Deloitte & Touche Central Europe. In his spare time, Wood likes to play golf, (he ranks himself as one of the top five players in Slovakia) and to sample Slovak beer. Taking Wood's place is Gerry Stanley, 45, who officially slid into the managing partner's chair on May 12 and is excited about having the opportunity to extend his stay in Slovakia.

"I am pleased that this new position will enable me to continue living in Slovakia and to continue working with outstanding colleagues and clients," he said. Stanley, who was born in West Virginia, took up permanent residency in Slovakia in 1995, together with his wife Joyce and daughter Marianne.

Stanley's educational background includes a degree in business and accountancy from the University of West Virginia.



Stanley has 23 years of experience with Deloitte & Touche, concentrating in banking, public utilities and international finance. Stanley enjoys travelling and an occasional friendly round of golf. "I like to leave the competitive golf to my colleague, Bob Wood," he added.

Steering the Austrian Airline's Bratislava office is Gunter Mytteis, 56, who started as director on June 1.

Mytteis studied economics at the University of Vienna, but he left there before graduating. In 1961, he joined Austrian Airlines, and has been with the company ever since. His loyalty to the airline has paid off, as Mytteis's resume includes stints in Moscow, Bucharest, Berlin, Cyprus [WHICH CITY? NICOSIA?] and Milan.

Though Mytteis's first visit to this country was as recent as the beginning of May, he's already buckled down on learning the competition and Austrian Airline's place in the industry, pointing out that the Austrian national air carrier was the first Western airline to open an office in the independent Slovak Republic. He hasn't forgotten his training either, saying that as director, he will make sure that Austrian Airlines always delivers excellent service and maintains good relations with travel agencies and officials as well.

Mytteis is married, and has two sons. In his free time, he said he loves to play golf, especially fire away on the driving range.

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