Embattled Gaulieder survives bombing

As František Gaulieder, the embattled former deputy in Parliament and ex-member of the Movement for a Democratic Slovakia (HZDS), fights for his seat back, he also could be fighting for his life.
That's because a bomb apparently directed at him exploded in front of his house in the west Slovak town of Galanta shortly after midnight on December 6. "After this terrorist act, I fear not only for my own life, but also for the lives of my wife and children," a shaken Gaulieder told the Slovak press agency TA SR.
The bomb, planted in the gas meter, demolished the front hall and blew out all the downstairs windows when it exploded, Gaulieder said. No suspects have been identified in the blast, which both Bratislava and Galanta police are investigating.

As František Gaulieder, the embattled former deputy in Parliament and ex-member of the Movement for a Democratic Slovakia (HZDS), fights for his seat back, he also could be fighting for his life.

That's because a bomb apparently directed at him exploded in front of his house in the west Slovak town of Galanta shortly after midnight on December 6. "After this terrorist act, I fear not only for my own life, but also for the lives of my wife and children," a shaken Gaulieder told the Slovak press agency TA SR.

The bomb, planted in the gas meter, demolished the front hall and blew out all the downstairs windows when it exploded, Gaulieder said. No suspects have been identified in the blast, which both Bratislava and Galanta police are investigating.

Gaulieder, 45, quit the party he helped found, saying its leadership had betrayed its voters by not sticking to its election program. şşThere are too many discrepancies between promises and acts, between the government's program and its fulfillment,'' Gaulieder said when explaining why he left the HZDS parliamentary club. şşThere have been too many activities that have nothing to do with building of a democratic society.''

şşWhy is privatization not transparent? Why do we pass laws that are anti-constitutional? Why do we offend foreign ambassadors? Why do we seek out enemies - at home, abroad, within the church, and in the academic community? Why are we unable to investigate serious crimes?'' Gaulieder asked, echoing many questions incessantly posed by opposition party deputies since HZDS Chairman Vladimír Mečiar formed a coalition government in December, 1994.

Gaulieder, who planned his withdrawal from the HZDS with his wife, said he could not "rule out" that the bombing "was politically motivated." "You can expect anything from these people,'' he added, referring to his former party mates.

The HZDS now has 60 out of the 150 seats in Parliament; the ruling coalition has 81. Gaulieder is the second deputy to leave the ruling coalition. He said he did not expect anyone to follow him: şşThose who would like to are afraid. And there are many who believe everything is all right.''

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