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Sex shop signs removed

The Slovak Presidency will not be sullied by the selling of sex. That was the message sent when Bratislava City Hall thrust itself into a swirl of controversy by stripping advertising placards from lamp posts in front of President Michal Kováč's new offices on Hodžovo námestie in the Slovak capital. The mayor's spokesman, Milan Vajda, acknowledged that the city is flirting with the law by taking down two yellow signs emblazoned with the red words "Sex Shop" and an arrow that points directly at the Grassalkovich Palace when viewed from certain angles.
"The city council is well aware that it has infringed on the property rights of private firms by dismantling this advertising," Vajda said, "and is ready to face legal consequences."


The beauty of advertising.
Rick Zedník

The Slovak Presidency will not be sullied by the selling of sex. That was the message sent when Bratislava City Hall thrust itself into a swirl of controversy by stripping advertising placards from lamp posts in front of President Michal Kováč's new offices on Hodžovo námestie in the Slovak capital.

The mayor's spokesman, Milan Vajda, acknowledged that the city is flirting with the law by taking down two yellow signs emblazoned with the red words "Sex Shop" and an arrow that points directly at the Grassalkovich Palace when viewed from certain angles.

"The city council is well aware that it has infringed on the property rights of private firms by dismantling this advertising," Vajda said, "and is ready to face legal consequences."

The signs, which are the property of the Ispa advertising agency, had been rented to the owner of a shop that peddles erotic wares on nearby Panenská ulica.

XXAfter his office received a stream of phone calls from citizens warning that the signs' unfortunate location might tempt coquettish comments, Mayor Peter Kresánek, a member of the Christian Democratic Movement (KDH), had ordered the signs be removed.

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