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Interior Minister Gustáv Krajči

Of the three new ministers, Gustáv Krajči, 45, taking over for the controversial Minister of the Interior Ľudovít Hudek, is the biggest unknown. His administrative experience has taken him as far as director of the regional office for Spišská Nová Ves; his political experience has landed him the post of secretary for Prime Minister Vladimír Mečiar's Movement for a Democratic Society (HZDS) in Bratislava. By profession, he is an educator, and unlike the outgoing minister Hudek - a lawyer who worked for the National Security Corps and was Attorney General - he has had no direct exposure to the Ministry of the Interior or the police. In his new post, Krajči's main task will be to reorganize the police force; he and Mečiar have already announced that a new police chief will be named and that staff shakeups are expected.


TASR

Of the three new ministers, Gustáv Krajči, 45, taking over for the controversial Minister of the Interior Ľudovít Hudek, is the biggest unknown. His administrative experience has taken him as far as director of the regional office for Spišská Nová Ves; his political experience has landed him the post of secretary for Prime Minister Vladimír Mečiar's Movement for a Democratic Society (HZDS) in Bratislava. By profession, he is an educator, and unlike the outgoing minister Hudek - a lawyer who worked for the National Security Corps and was Attorney General - he has had no direct exposure to the Ministry of the Interior or the police.

In his new post, Krajči's main task will be to reorganize the police force; he and Mečiar have already announced that a new police chief will be named and that staff shakeups are expected.

"First of all, I want to clean up my own department by making all my employees take responsibility for their own actions," Krajči told the Slovak press agency TASR.

Krajči's only managerial work was the two years he spent as director of the regional office in Spišská Nová Ves. However, one source close to town administrator who requested anonymity told The Slovak Spectator that even at that level, Krajči was little respected. Before taking over the director's role in 1993, Krajči was director of the vocational high school for miners in the east Slovak town of Rudňany. Krajči, who was born in Fiľakovo in south-central Slovakia, studied high school education at the Pedagogical Faculty in the Pavol Jozef Šafárik University in Prešov. He also taught at the Rudňany mining academy and at a basic school Spišská Nová Ves.

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