OUR PICK

For dinner in the woods, try Koliba Expo

Set on a forested hill above Bratislava, Koliba Expo offers very good food in a quiet, woodsy atmosphere. The restaurant, unfortunately, is not accessible by public transportation. However, if you are in the mood for hiking or want to justify the calories, take the 213 trolley-bus in the "Koliba" direction to the end, then walk uphill through the park about 20 minutes. Well placed signs point the way. The restaurant's inside seats 90 and there is room for 50 on the terrace in the summer. If you dine on the terrace, bring plenty of mosquito repellent! We were not the only ones having a meal - so were the mosquitos!

Address:Kamzíkov vrch
Tel.:371-781, 371-764
Hours:Mon.-Sat. 12:00 - 1:00, Sun. 12:00 -24:00
Cuisine:Slovak
Prices:Sk Sk
Reservations:Recommended
English menu:No (German)
Credit Cards:No
Recommended:Moderately


Set on a forested hill above Bratislava, Koliba Expo offers very good food in a quiet, woodsy atmosphere. The restaurant, unfortunately, is not accessible by public transportation. However, if you are in the mood for hiking or want to justify the calories, take the 213 trolley-bus in the "Koliba" direction to the end, then walk uphill through the park about 20 minutes. Well placed signs point the way.

The restaurant's inside seats 90 and there is room for 50 on the terrace in the summer. If you dine on the terrace, bring plenty of mosquito repellent! We were not the only ones having a meal - so were the mosquitos!

Though the décor is designed in a cozy traditional Koliba style, there is no Gypsy or folk music. The violin-electric piano combination is out of place. There is no music on Sundays. The dishes on the menu are elaborate, many with names that give no clue as to what they are. Fortunately, we had a patient waitress.

That having been said, the food here is excellent. Madeline tried the Liptovský závitok (122 Sk), thinly pounded pork stuffed with ground game in a rich meaty sauce and small bits of bacon. Paul sampled the Živánska (136 Sk), beef and pork stuffed with sausage, onion and bacon. The spicy cabbage salad (9.50 Sk) was fresh and crunchy. We did not encounter a long wait to be served, as we have in some restaurants.

Prices at this restaurant are fairly high. Our dinner for two cost 560 Sk. It did not include appetizers and we shared a dessert. Beware of the cost of the wine - it is 25 Sk per deciliter, making one normal serving 50 Sk! A 5 cl serving of plum brandy is 40 Sk. The palacinky, though delicious, were 75 Sk, the highest price we have encountered and too pricey in our opinion. Notwithstanding the higher prices, the management feels comfortable with a 15 Sk cover. The prices include garnish in most cases, but it is nothing to write home about.

Customers need to be careful regarding the surcharge for extra decagrams of fish, chicken and goose liver. For some reason, the surcharge is not listed with the dish itself, but rather in a totally different section of the menu. These range from 4 Sk for chicken, 6 Sk for trout, and 38 Sk for goose liver.

The menu is varied and interesting and the food is good, but be careful if you are watching your wallet.

Paul Zendzian and Madeline Vadkerty are the authors of Bon Appetit, Dobrú Chuť, Bratislava!, which is available at select bookstores and news stands.

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