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Mečiar's spokesman resigns

After seven months as the coalition government's press secretary, Tomáš Hasala is calling it quits. Like a good spokesman, however, he would not comment specifically on why he was leaving, other than to say it was "for personal reasons." Hasala, who started in the government's press office last January and then moved up to be the spokesman in March, said he had not decided what he would do next, though he did tell the daily Novy Čas that he was "considering a couple of offers." One of those offers will certainly not be the press secretary for one of the oppostion parties. "I heard that I would be working as the press spokesman for the DU [Democratic Union]," Hasala said. "But those rumors are created so fast that they're extraordinarily funny."

After seven months as the coalition government's press secretary, Tomáš Hasala is calling it quits. Like a good spokesman, however, he would not comment specifically on why he was leaving, other than to say it was "for personal reasons."

Hasala, who started in the government's press office last January and then moved up to be the spokesman in March, said he had not decided what he would do next, though he did tell the daily Novy Čas that he was "considering a couple of offers." One of those offers will certainly not be the press secretary for one of the oppostion parties. "I heard that I would be working as the press spokesman for the DU [Democratic Union]," Hasala said. "But those rumors are created so fast that they're extraordinarily funny."

The twenty-three-year old Hasala has an excellent command of English, having studied political science and history for a year in the United States. His sudden departure has again left a void in the government's press office, and a successor has yet to be named. The press office's manager, Soňa Záňová, denied that she would be selected to fill the position.

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