Spectator on facebook

Spectator on facebook

Visegrad toughens EU stance

The government heads of Slovakia, Hungary, Poland and the Czech Republic yesterday agreed at a meeting in Hungary’s Ostrihom that their countries could not join the EU if they were to be net payers to the EU budget, and if they did not receive the same farm aid as member states.

The leaders were meeting under the aegis of the Visegrad Four regional association, of which they are members. They said proposals to have new EU member states wait at least seven years before receiving full agricultural aid had to be radically shortened.

The summit was the first for the group since February, when then-Hungarian PM Viktor Orbán angered his counterparts with nationalist statements.

New Hungarian leader Péter Medgyessy and Slovak PM Mikuláš Dzurinda agreed to have officials from their respective Foreign Ministries negotiate at the beginning of July to solve a dispute over a ‘status law’ for Hungarians living abroad.

Compiled by Tom Nicholson from press reports.
The Slovak Spectator cannot vouch for the accuracy of the information presented in its Flash News postings.

Top stories

How the national emblem appeared – including so far secret communism designs

Even Slovaks often do not know why the national emblem depicts a white double-cross, and not the Kriváň peak, or the design by artist Vincent Hložník. They also do not know why it makes a difference whether it is…

Offical Slovak national emblem and colours

Bratislava Zoo will have new wolf breeding station

One of most significant investments of the Bratislava Zoo in the year 2017 will be the building of a new wolf breeding station.

Foreigners: Events around Slovakia Photo

Tips for performances and other events in the Slovak regions between February 17 and February 26, including a race on old wooden sleighs, an operetta premiere, a lot of jazz, classical and rock music, and more.

Rce in krňačky sleighing, Turecká 2017

Some food really is better in Austria, study finds

EC says its role is to monitor safety, not quality – but Slovaks want the same as Austrians, says minister.

Illustrative stock photo