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Communists collect money to feed campaign

THE COMMUNIST Party of Slovakia (KSS) has decided to ask its members to contribute to the party's campaign from their own pockets.
With its two to four per cent popular support, the party is having a difficult time convincing sponsors to invest in the KSS. Parties in Slovakia have to score over five per cent in elections to secure seats in parliament.
KSS members have therefore been asked to make voluntary contributions according to their financial situations. The KSS will use the money to distribute party billboards and leaflets around the country.

THE COMMUNIST Party of Slovakia (KSS) has decided to ask its members to contribute to the party's campaign from their own pockets.

With its two to four per cent popular support, the party is having a difficult time convincing sponsors to invest in the KSS. Parties in Slovakia have to score over five per cent in elections to secure seats in parliament.

KSS members have therefore been asked to make voluntary contributions according to their financial situations. The KSS will use the money to distribute party billboards and leaflets around the country.

KSS head Jozef Ševc said contributions so far were ranging from Sk100 to Sk500 ($2 to $10). The KSS will spend Sk3 million on its pre-election campaign, although the legal limit is Sk12 million.

Ševc also said that the KSS would not start putting up its billboards until September 1. With elections set for September 20-21, that leaves the party only two weeks to campaign.

"If we placed the posters even one day earlier, we'd have to pay a whole month's rent for the billboard space. The KSS doesn't have so much money," Ševc said.

-Martina Pisárová

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