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IN THIS SUMMER SERIES, FOREIGN WOMEN SHARE THEIR EXPERIENCES OF LIVING IN BRATISLAVA

Love of footie one of few Slovak-Malaysia ties

MANISA GUY is the new member coordinator for the International Women's Club of Bratislava. She comes from Malaysia and has been living in Slovakia for almost two-and-a-half years. Her husband, Walt Guy, is the general manager of the ON Semiconductor firm.


Manisa Guy
photo: Spectator archives

MANISA GUY is the new member coordinator for the International Women's Club of Bratislava. She comes from Malaysia and has been living in Slovakia for almost two-and-a-half years. Her husband, Walt Guy, is the general manager of the ON Semiconductor firm.


The Slovak Spectator (TSS): What Slovak dish or drink do you like and why?

Manisa Guy (MG): Garlic roasted chicken with garlic roasted potatoes and Frankovka Modrá 2000 red wine. My husband was never a fan of red wine until I introduced him to this one.


TSS: What surprised you the most when you came to Slovakia?

MG: The weather - I knew it would be cold in the winter but never expected it to reach 38 Celsius in the summer. The pace of life here is slower than what I was accustomed to. I was also surprised by the number of Slovaks who had been to Malaysia.


TSS: What advice would you give to a foreigner who comes to Slovakia for the first time?

MG: For the ladies, join the International Women's Club to meet other expatriates as well as Slovak women, for support, information and friendship. Make efforts to befriend the locals. My Slovak friends help me to better understand the way life is here, and enable me to look at it from a different perspective. Be patient. Expect the unexpected. Learn the language, at least the basics.


TSS: What will be your lasting memories of Slovakia?

MG: Attending a traditional Slovak wedding. Dancing on a cold and snowy night in Staré Mesto on New Year's Eve. My first attempt to speak Slovak and to be understood.


TSS: What is the main difference or similarity in character between Slovaks and people of your nationality?

MG: Malaysia is very different from Slovakia, the climate, people, food, etc. The only similarity we have is our love of football.



KATHERINE GOODISH
photo: Spectator archives

KATHERINE GOODISH is American and a homemaker. She is married to John H. Goddish, the president of US Steel Košice. She has been in Slovakia for almost two years.


The Slovak Spectator (TSS): What is your favourite place to go to eat and drink in Slovakia and why?

Katherine Goodish (KG): The Letná in Košice is my favourite restaurant because the food is consistently good and they have two of my favourite things: fresh-squeezed orange juice and an 'American' style lettuce salad. I enjoy sauerkraut soup, especially that at the Slovan Hotel.


TSS: What is your favourite place to visit or go for a trip?

KG: I have travelled from Košice to Bratislava many times and enjoy the beauty of the countryside. The only place we have actually spent the night has been in the High Tatras, a beautiful, relaxing place to spend some time.


TSS: What surprised you the most when you came to Slovakia?

KG: The first time I visited, I was most surprised by how beautiful Košice is, and I learned very quickly that not only are the people friendly, they are also very talented.


TSS: What will be your lasting memories of Slovakia?

KG: I will have many lasting memories of my time in Slovakia. I have made wonderful, lasting friendships. It's the people who make a place special.


TSS: What do you bring as a present from Slovakia back home?

KG: My favourite gifts are the beautiful handmade items such as dolls, wood carvings, ceramics, Easter eggs, Bohemian crystal, and Blue Onion dishes.

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