Spectator on facebook

Spectator on facebook

IN SHORT

Rusko sees no need for more TV stations

PAVOL Rusko, head of the ruling coalition's Citizen's New Alliance (Ano) party and a founder of the country's most popular TV station Markíza, has said Slovakia needs only two television broadcasters - a public and a private one.

Concerns over Rusko's influence in media legislation have grown since it was announced that Ano's Rudolf Chmel was to be the next Culture Minister, a position with a lot of influence on media legislation.

Rusko, however, has denied that any abuse of the position would take place. "There are so many checks and balances that the idea of abuse is complete nonsense," Rusko said. However, he has claimed that Slovakia should practice the so-called dual model of TV broadcasting because "the market is not big enough to allow quality public and private broadcasters and several other private TV stations."

"If Rusko was saying this as head of a private TV station, I wouldn't comment on it. But he's saying it as a politician and I consider that to be very dangerous," said Martin Lengyel, head of Slovak news TV channel TA3.

"It's in conflict with the liberal theses of Ano's party program," he added.

Top stories

In praise of concrete

It was once notorious for its drab tower blocks and urban crime, but Petržalka now epitomises modern Slovakia.

Petržalka is the epitome of communist-era architecture.

Safari under High Tatras Video

Marek Stolarčík from Kežmarok filmed unique video.

Illustration stock photo

Slow down, fashion

Most people are unaware that buying too many clothes too harms the environment.

In shallow waters, experts are expendable

Mihál says that it is Sulík, the man whom his political opponents mocked for having a calculator for a brain, who “is pulling the party out of liberal waters and towards somewhere completely different”.

Richard Sulík is a man of slang.