Hrušovský speech draws applause

Parliamentary speaker Pavol Hrušovský, in a speech marking the 10th anniversary of independent Slovakia on January 1, spoke of the nation's long history under Hungarian and Czech influence, and called for "a new political culture".

Addressing parliamentarians in a special ceremony, Hrušovský made direct reference to some of the most controversial areas of Slovakia's past, calling the nineteenth century Hungarian empire part of Slovakia's identity, and referring to the deportation of 70,000 Slovak Jews under the second world war Nazi-dominated Slovak state "a heritage and a black mark in Slovak history that we are still trying to deal with".

The speech was hailed by politicians and analysts alike as a courageous attempt to create a vision of Slovakia's future based on acceptance of its past.

"I was very impressed, because it is the first time we have heard an attempt from a top politician to come to terms with the past, to use history rather than abuse it," said historian Ľubomír Lipták.

"I wanted to say something that wasn't too political, but which would be a truly statesmanlike look at Slovakia and the roots of our nationhood," Hrušovský said after the speech.

Get daily Slovak news directly to your inbox

Top stories

Cabinet agrees on COVID screening

More details will be presented tomorrow.

Košice

More tips for outings in Bratislava during the lockdown

Walks along the Danube bank offer a feeling of being far from the city rush.

This place, part of Ovsištské Lúky (Ovsište Meadows) in Petržalka, is still Bratislava.

Roundup: Fairytale app that makes children read

An award-winning design by a Slovak architect and a trip to Zádielska dolina valley. Here’s your latest roundup.

A man wearing a face covering sits in an armchair on the snow-covered Main Street in Košice on January 13, 2021.

Police investigate surveillance of journalist, IPI calls for utmost seriousness

Police launch criminal prosecution after Denník N reporter said she was followed and opposition MP Robert Fico wrote about her private life.

l-r: Head of Let's Stop Corruption Foundation Zuzana Petková, journalist Monika Tódová, journalist Adam Valček, and Xénia Makarová of the Let's Stop Corruption Foundation