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Aurel Award show party postponed after bomb hoax
Suicide in the Carlton
Local firm shoes football stars
Deer's human mama
21 dead sheep found in forest

Bratislava
Aurel Award show party postponed after bomb hoax

A PARTY after the award ceremony for the best Slovak pop music of 2002 had to be postponed March 7, after the Holiday Inn hotel hosting the event received a phone call saying there was a bomb in the hall.
No bomb was found and the party got started after a two-hour delay, at about 1:00 in the morning of March 8.
The Aurel 2002 ceremony, held at the Istropolis centre, ran smoothly. The most successful artist of the evening was 28-year-old r&b singer Misha, who won awards for best new artist and best female artist. Her debut album, Colors In My Life, was also named album of the year, and brought a producer award for Marián Kachút.
Pop singer Richard Muller won the best male artist award for the second consecutive year, and the alternative band Horkýže Slíže won the best duo or group category. Marián Varga received an award for his lifetime contribution to Slovak popular music.


Bratislava
Suicide in the Carlton

A CHAMBERMAID in one of the country's most luxurious hotels near the US embassy in Bratislava found a dead woman who most likely killed herself by putting a gun in her mouth and shooting.
The dead woman, whom police identified as Ľuboslava Š., 25, from the village of Potvorice in western Slovak Nové Zámky district was found dead wearing black gloves in a room on the Carlton's fifth floor early March 7.
Bratislava police deputy chief Ľudovít Mihál told Nový Čas: "According to the findings we have gathered so far, it seems likely that the woman committed suicide."
The woman checked into the hotel one day before she was found dead. The hotel refused to comment on the case.
The Carlton was reopened for a mainly international clientele last year, after massive reconstruction.
The hotel, situated in Bratislava's historical Hviezdoslavovo Square just a few metres from the national theatre witnessed another suicide nearly a century ago.
In the 1920s, the Carlton's then-owner Henry Pruger killed himself, reportedly because of mounting debts arising from the reconstruction of the hotel.


Bardejov
Local firm shoes football stars

DIEGO Maradona, David Seaman, Lothar Matthäus, Christo Stoichkov, and Didier Deschamps are some of the world's football stars who had their soccer shoes made in Slovakia.
Eastern Slovak firm JAS-Export in Bardejov produces the Puma shoes in which, for example, the Cameroon and Italy national teams played in the most recent World Cup in Japan and South Korea in 2002.
"For some footballers we make shoes based on special requirements," Jozef Štalmach, head of JAS-Export, told the daily Pravda, adding that the production of a special shoe for football stars takes two weeks.
"Currently we are producing football shoes for [the English player] Owen Hargreaves, [Swedish international] Zlatan Ibrahimovich, and [Croatian player] Zvonimir Soldo," he said.
The German Puma concern is JAS-Export's biggest customer, ordering as much as 80 per cent of the football shoes the company produces.
JAS-Export's executive director Ján Kučeravý said that a number of Slovak shoe factories either worked for world brands or were owned by international concerns.
"This is globalisation in reality," Kučeravý said.
He added that a number of global shoe firms transferred their production to the eastern part of Europe to profit from the cheaper workforce. While average monthly wages in JAS-Export are Sk9,200 (220 euro), a pair of football shoes produced there can be sold for almost three times that much.
The company last year produced more than 500,000 pairs of sports shoes, which is 20 per cent more than in 2001.


Žilina
Deer's human mama

GABIKA Bulejová began taking care of a male deer one year ago, raising the animal in the garden of her house in the centre of Slovakia's northern city of Žilina.
Bulejová's brother found the deer in May 2002 while riding a horse in a nearby forest.
"He brought the baby deer to me and asked whether I wanted to take care of him," Bulejová told daily Nový Čas. She agreed, and named the deer Samko.
"When he was small he would sleep next to me in my bed. We had to feed him cow's milk, otherwise he would be sick," she said.
Bulejová said her 11-year-old son Erik enjoys playing with Samko, and sometimes even takes him for walks in the streets.
"When Erik took him for a walk in the street, people would wonder what kind of toy he was. But none of them knew that we found Samko in the forest next to his dead mother and that we raised him by ourselves. He couldn't even walk and was maybe two days old then," Bulejová said.


Horný Tisovník
21 dead sheep found in forest

POLICE are looking for the person who disposed of 21 dead sheep in a forest near the southern Slovak town of Horný Tisovník.
Local foresters discovered the bodies of the seemingly underfed animals between the region's Stará Huta and Blýskavica areas. They said the sheep had been dumped in several heaps and were frozen.
Police are searching for the owner of the animals.


Compiled by Martina Pisárová from press reports

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