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Parliament passes labour code amendment

PARLIAMENT passed an amendment to Slovakia's labour code proposed by Labour Minister Ľudovít Kaník, with several comments, at its session on May 21.
The bill was approved by 86 out of 132 attending MPs. Twelve were against, 33 abstained, and one did not vote.
Lawmakers applauded the inclusion of a provision preventing employers from seeking information on sexual orientation of an employee or job applicant, an issue that had raised controversy over the past few weeks.

PARLIAMENT passed an amendment to Slovakia's labour code proposed by Labour Minister Ľudovít Kaník, with several comments, at its session on May 21.

The bill was approved by 86 out of 132 attending MPs. Twelve were against, 33 abstained, and one did not vote.

Lawmakers applauded the inclusion of a provision preventing employers from seeking information on sexual orientation of an employee or job applicant, an issue that had raised controversy over the past few weeks.

The amendment makes it easier to fire undisciplined employees, and the term of notice for standard work contracts was shortened to two months from three months. It increases flexibility in labour relations as it defines only the basic framework and leaves the rest up to the collective bargaining in companies.

Moreover, the amendment cancels the institute of performed work contract, which used to be misused for illegal work and concurrent reception of social benefits. It will be replaced by a shortened external work contract of up to 20 hours a week. The term of notice is set at 15 days for this type of work.

Comments approved by parliament include the employment of students simultaneous with their daily studies and during holidays. Lawmakers also increased the number of employee board members in bigger companies.

In response to the passing of the amendment, trade unions have announced that they will ask President Rudolf Schuster not to sign the law.

- TASR

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