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Former spy boss out of custody

Ivan Lexa, former head of the Slovak Information Service (SIS), whose many charges include ordering the murder of a go-between to a key witness in the 1995 kidnapping of the former president's son, was released from custody after six months in jail.

Lexa served as SIS chief under the 1994-1998 administration of now opposition MP Vladimír Mečiar.

A Bratislava judge decided recently that there was no reason to prolong Lexa's custody, even though he fled justice for more than two years when first accused of the crimes. Lexa was found last year in South Africa and was brought back to Slovakia by police.

Lexa's lawyers insisted that their client was going to cooperate with investigators, adding that he had no passport and no reason to leave the state.

Talking briefly to journalists awaiting his release on June 5, the former spy boss said: "I am not interested in travelling abroad. What for?"

A group of elderly people gathered to greet Lexa on his release, with one fan bringing him a welcome cake.

Compiled by Martina Pisárová from press reports.
The Slovak Spectator cannot vouch for the accuracy of the information presented in its Flash News postings.

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