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Ask Kristína

Q: I am a US businessman and I would like to know if there is a psychiatrist in Slovakia who speaks English. Perhaps the US Embassy can help?
Q: How much does it cost to send a
registered letter (doporučený list) within this country? Also, at the post office, which window should I go to when sending this kind of letter?
Q: Kristína, what are the photos of young people stuck in the shop windows in the town centre?

 

Q: I am a US businessman and I would like to know if there is a psychiatrist in Slovakia who speaks English. Perhaps the US Embassy can help?

A: Yes, the US Embassy in Slovakia is the first place you should turn to. The American Citizens Services Unit provides a special service to Americans in this country. If you call 02/5922-3141, the staff will give you a list of English-speaking doctors that specialise in this area. I hope this helps.


Q: How much does it cost to send a registered letter (doporučený list) within this country? Also, at the post office, which window should I go to when sending this kind of letter?

A: The windows you need to go to are called listové zásielky. In Bratislava's main post office, they are located on the right side of the entrance. The assistants usually speak English and if they don't, they will ask their colleagues to help out.

The base charge for a second-class registered letter (the addressee signs the receipt) is Sk11, plus extra money for the weight of the letter. Items up to 20 grams cost an additional Sk7. From 20 grams to 50 grams, the additional charge is Sk9 and for anything from 50 grams to 0.5 kilograms it is Sk13. If you're sending the letter first class, the original fee remains the same but the extra cost for weight increases - up to 20 grams this is Sk12. From 20 grams to 50 grams it is Sk13 and from 50 grams to 0.5 kilograms it is Sk16.

If you want to receive confirmation of delivery (doručenie s potvrdením dodania), you will be asked to pay Sk18 more.


Q: Kristína, what are the photos of young people stuck in the shop windows in the town centre?

A: The people in the pictures are this year's high-school graduates. The posters, which consist of photographs of the students arranged on a piece of poster board, are known as tablá. The students produce a tablo and take it to a shop in the town centre, which puts the poster into its window, before the nervous youngsters lock themselves in their rooms to study for their school-leaving exams. The act of presenting their posters is usually happy and loud, with students asking passers-by for donations to help fund end-of-school celebrations.

The tablá usually stay in the shop windows for two weeks, and are given back to the schools after graduation.


Got a question?
Ask Kristína: kristina.havasova@gpp.sk

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