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MPs unsure about conflict-of-interests law

Several MPs have said there could be problems with the draft conflict-of-interests law scheduled to be discussed during the upcoming parliamentary session.

A number of MPs from the ruling parties, who earlier pledged to support the anti-graft legislation, are now saying it contains several problematic areas. The opposition Communist Party has always been against the law.

The legislation is an update on the existing conflict-of-interests law, which many slammed as ineffective in the past. The new version of the law, proposed by the Justice Ministry, would introduce tougher penalties for MPs and other public officials who are found acting in conflict of interests and who fail to publish their property declarations regularly.

Ľubomír Lintner of the ruling New Citizen's Alliance said that "there are several problematic issues" in the proposal, including the obligation of closest family relatives of public officials to publish property declarations.

But Justice Minister Daniel Lipšic said: "If MPs really mean their words that they want to fight corruption, they should support the law."

Compiled by Martina Pisárová from press reports.
The Slovak Spectator cannot vouch for the accuracy of the information presented in its Flash News postings.

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