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Reader feedback: Shut out corrupt lecturers

Re: Corruption still pays at Slovak universities, By Lukáš Fila, July 7 - July 13,2003, Vol 9, No 26

There is widespread corruption at my university. Let me give you a few examples.

Firstly, corruption occurs when some teachers give tests to selected friends or relatives.

Secondly, corruption happens at the so-called oral entrance examinations. That's exactly why some universities insist on keeping it! I estimate that almost every sixth student at university where I work gets in this way.

Thirdly, corruption occurs when these, often less than ideal students, fail at exams during their studies.

Most lecturers I know personally are either corrupt or tolerate corruption.

How is it possible to fight this immoral "social consensus"? I personally do not request preferential treatment for anybody, although many have requested this kind of "help" from me.

There must be a clear set of measures for universities, which will prevent them from acting corruptly.

Usually the most corrupt individuals are those who do not produce scientific works. So the first step might be to eliminate those who do not work scientifically.

The second step might be to exclude those who work at multiple universities - these people obey all orders in order to keep their jobs.

The third step would be to organise entrance exams only at an external basis, i.e. have the tests prepared and evaluated by an external company, leaving the deans no chance to accept anyone other than those who pass these tests.

Finally, it might be useful to include a law that any corruption at universities will lead either to the abolition of the whole department from which a particular lecturer comes or to the exclusion of a particular lecturer from public service for the rest of his or her life.

Richard Seifert,
Slovakia

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