Slovak company sells fresh air to Japan

Slovak towns and companies now have an easy way to make money, SME daily writes. Thy can sell "their clean air" to developed countries for millions of dollars.

The first Slovak firm Menert and two towns, Šaľa and Nové Zámky, which have been emitting less carbon dioxide than the Kyoto protocol allows have sold credits for their unused greenhouse gas allowance to Japanese company Sumimoto.

The trade is reportedly the first emmissions deal under the Kyoto Protocol, which requires signatory countries to reduce emmissions of six greenhouse gasses. EU member and accession states, all of whom are signatories, are required to cut emmissions across the enlarged union by 8 percent below 1990 levels by 2012.

To help spread the cost and reduce economic impacts of the reductions, the EU is planning to set up an international bourse for ermmissions trading by 2005, allowing countries not using their full Kyoto quota to sell surplus emmissions in the form of credits to other countries and firms.

Unofficial data says that Japan paid more than USD1.5 million to the western Slovak town of Šaľa for the credits. The Netherlands is also interested in buying "fresh air" from Slovakia.

Compiled by Beata Balogová from press reports
The Slovak Spectator cannot vouch for the accuracy of the information presented in its Flash News postings.

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