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Time for a Poem

THE POSTERS featuring poems that have recently appeared all around the capital on billboards and public transportation are part of a project entitled Time for a Poem. The project will run until August 18.
The project's aim is to bring contemporary poetry as close to the public as possible. Poets from Austria, Slovenia, Croatia and Slovakia created poems with a general theme - meetings.
Time for a Poem is more than just the mere presentation of lyric poetry; it is a political sign of new, united Europe, which retains its historic and languistic identity towards achieving a common goal. The title of the project also means that people should find the time to stop and read a poem, and forget their everyday stress.

THE POSTERS featuring poems that have recently appeared all around the capital on billboards and public transportation are part of a project entitled Time for a Poem. The project will run until August 18.

The project's aim is to bring contemporary poetry as close to the public as possible. Poets from Austria, Slovenia, Croatia and Slovakia created poems with a general theme - meetings.

Time for a Poem is more than just the mere presentation of lyric poetry; it is a political sign of new, united Europe, which retains its historic and languistic identity towards achieving a common goal. The title of the project also means that people should find the time to stop and read a poem, and forget their everyday stress.

This event took place for the first time in 1983 in Viena. It later went international with displays in Prague, Budapest, Bratislava, Ljubljana and Zagreb. The motto of the year 2003 is "Lyric Poetry Without Borders - Meetings", and the project will be displayed in the countries of the participating authors, in the language of the country. The poems are short and simple, forming silent messages of language in the loud world of products.

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