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Communists defend 1968 Soviet invasion

THE PARLIAMENTARY Slovak Communist Party (KSS) openly defended former Czechoslovakia's invasion by the Warsaw Pact armies in 1968, daily SME writes.

Marking the nearing 35th anniversary of the invasion, KSS boss Jozef Ševc indirectly condemned the Prague Spring reform movement and the activities of the then Czechoslovak Communist Party leader Alexander Dubček.

However, Ševc said that the KSS apologises to all who suffered any wrong. He added that he would even support a law to reimburse victims of the era.

The KSS denies being a successor of the totalitarian Czechoslovak Communist Party (KSČ) but has never condemned its practices and deeds.

"We value everything that this party (KSČ) has done - good and bad equally," Ševc says. According to him, the KSS is capable of political self-reflection and is open to working with other political parties in Slovakia.

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