Budmerice citizens in Japan

THE HOUSE of Culture in the western Slovak village of Budmerice is telling the stories of seven of its inhabitants who lived and worked in Japan.
The exhibition, entitled Budmerice Citizens in Japan, opened on October 4 in the presence of five guests from Japan. It displays photographs, books, artefacts, posters, and documents, as well as video-records that map the stays of seven various Budmerice ihabitants, each of whom has independently spent some time in Japan from 1932 to the present.


JOZEF Mládek captured two thirds of Japan in photos.
photo: Jozef Mládek

THE HOUSE of Culture in the western Slovak village of Budmerice is telling the stories of seven of its inhabitants who lived and worked in Japan.

The exhibition, entitled Budmerice Citizens in Japan, opened on October 4 in the presence of five guests from Japan. It displays photographs, books, artefacts, posters, and documents, as well as video-records that map the stays of seven various Budmerice ihabitants, each of whom has independently spent some time in Japan from 1932 to the present.

"The aim of the exhibition is to present the citizens of Budmerice who, during their long-term stays in Japan, have been admired by the locals for their skills, art talent, or sport accomplishments," Alena Kadlečíková, the event's organizer and a Budmerice citizen, told The Slovak Spectator.

Among them is missionary František Babulík, whom Pope Pavol VI named the Protonotary Apostolic. Spending more than 40 years in Japan, he lived in Nagoya, where he built a Roman Catholic Church - where he is also buried.

The other featured Budmerice citizens are writer, painter, and traveller Rudolf Fabry, who wrote a book about his journey and stay; Stanislav Marušinec, a well known cook whose food has been tasted by a Japanese Emperor, as well as 11 world presidents; Monika Melcová, a renowned organ and piano player, who has been engaged by the Sapporo Concert Hall on the island of Hokkaido; sportsman Peter Németh, who went to Japan to improve in martial arts; and Jozef Mládek, a university professor, scientist, and writer.

Jaroslav Molnár, a municipal officer, said at the opening that he knows other people from Budmerice who have gone to Japan, such as the SĽUK folk ensemble's violoncellist Rastislav Šipoš.

"It is amazing that such people all came from one village," said Kadlečíková.

"The whole idea, to get them together, originated by chance. I was working on organizing an exhibition for professor Mládek, who has travelled two thirds of Japan. Later I realized that there are several other people from the village who have lived and worked in Japan, so I gradually brought them together."

Budmerice is located 39 kilometres northeast of Bratislava (eight kilometres from Modra). The exhibition runs until October 19 in the House of Culture (Kultúrny dom), at J. Rašu 525, Budmerice. Apart from Sunday, when it is open from 16:00 to 18:00, a visit must be arranged by calling 0908/128-600 (Alena Kadlečíková).


- Zuzana Habšudová

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