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Kerekes: More Slovak documentaries coming

The Slovak Spectator (TSS): What is your new film, 66 Seasons, about?
Peter Kerekes (PK): The film is composed of several stories that take place at the old swimming pool in Košice, the former city swimming pool, during the years between 1936 and 2002. The film thus depicts 66 seasons of the swimming pool's life. It's about ordinary people, their everyday stories, and how big historical events plopped down on them.


KEREKEŠ on film "holiday".
photo: Martin Kollár

The Slovak Spectator (TSS): What is your new film, 66 Seasons, about?

Peter Kerekes (PK): The film is composed of several stories that take place at the old swimming pool in Košice, the former city swimming pool, during the years between 1936 and 2002. The film thus depicts 66 seasons of the swimming pool's life. It's about ordinary people, their everyday stories, and how big historical events plopped down on them.

TSS: What was the filming like at such a nontraditional place?

PK: Very good. It was a holiday - but I shouldn't say this because others would envy me. Slovak filmmakers worked hard and we were splashing in a swimming pool.

TSS: And meanwhile you worked on a film...

PK: ... which tours the world.

TSS: The world?

PK:The film had its premiere at the [Czech] Karlove Vary festival. These days the film returns from Athens, it should open the Festival of European Films in Vienna, and meanwhile it will be shown at the Jihlava festival.

TSS: What significance does the Jihlava festival have for Slovak documentary filmmakers like you?

PK: There are two purposes. From a [general] professional viewpoint it's a festival that talks about documentary film. People who hardly meet during the year because they are busy meet there.

And for Slovak filmmakers it's important because it offers space for central European productions. It selects the best from that area and invites western guests who are important in bringing the films to other festivals, and onto TV.

TSS: Last year, the festival screened three or four Slovak films. This year, you will be the only Slovak representative there. Why?

PK: Well, not enough films have been made [over the last year]. There are several interesting projects that are in progress.

And I have to say, working on an alternative documentary is much more interesting and lively than on a [classical] feature film - and now [the other filmmakers] will eat me.

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