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Jazz, folk, and blues for Slnko

THE RE-RELEASE of these debut albums from the Slnko records label and Dlhé diely band, one under Daniel Salontay's direction, and one under Šina's, are not without their bonuses. A live video comes on each, as well as excellent English translations of the lyrics.


photo: Courtesy of Slnko records.jpg

THE RE-RELEASE of these debut albums from the Slnko records label and Dlhé diely band, one under Daniel Salontay's direction, and one under Šina's, are not without their bonuses. A live video comes on each, as well as excellent English translations of the lyrics.

September is an intimate, earnest, and minimal album. Cut down to basic elements of jazz, blues, and alternative rock, the music brings the listener close to each note, and to each word that Salontay sings. His lyrics are simple - though not simplistic - and personal, telling stories rooted in real-life situations. At moments, both the words and the composition reveal the delicate and intelligent structure behind the music. Salontay's use of unusual instruments and unorthodox combinations, like playing


photo: Courtesy of Slnko records.jpg

the guitar with a bow, gives the album its own spin.

Intimate lyrics are also found on Šinadisk, though in the form of abstract metaphor. Šina's low voice could be a growl if it weren't soft and smooth, and she uses it to hold together dramatic switches in instrumentation as well as fields of ambience and subterranean beats. Overall, the composition has the ability to seem quiet but to still be driving, carried by the bass and the insistence of electronic percussion along lilting folk breakbeat melodies.

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