Spectator on facebook

Spectator on facebook

No agreement on NBÚ boss

THE CABINET has again failed to approve a new director for the National Security Office (NBÚ) after two of the four ruling partners refused to support former chief investigator Jaroslav Ivor for the job.

The post is currently filled by acting chief Matej Sudor, whose term the cabinet prolonged until the end February.

The Slovak daily Pravda wrote that the Christian Democrats (KDH) expressed their opposition to Ivor's candidacy by suggesting he would most likely not pass security screening after a prepared amendment on the protection of classified information is passed. Ivor went through investigators' training in Moscow under communism. The prepared amendment bans people who received training at specialized communist institutions from accessing classified data.

The Hungarian Coalition Party (SMK) also argued that Ivor is not a good candidate because he is perceived to be too close to head of the Slovak Intelligence Service, Ladislav Pittner, who ran the Interior Ministry when Ivor led the investigators.

"The public might perceived it as sensitive that Ivor and Pittner have a close relationship," Pál Csáky, SMK's vice chairman and the country's Deputy PM for integration, told the daily on December 18.

The SMK and the KDH insisted that a new head of the NBÚ must be picked through the unanimous agreement of all ruling parties.

Compiled by Martina Pisárová from press reports
The Slovak Spectator cannot vouch for the accuracy of the information presented in its Flash News postings.

Top stories

In praise of concrete

It was once notorious for its drab tower blocks and urban crime, but Petržalka now epitomises modern Slovakia.

Petržalka is the epitome of communist-era architecture.

Slow down, fashion

Most people are unaware that buying too many clothes too harms the environment.

In shallow waters, experts are expendable

Mihál says that it is Sulík, the man whom his political opponents mocked for having a calculator for a brain, who “is pulling the party out of liberal waters and towards somewhere completely different”.

Richard Sulík is a man of slang.

Blog: Exploring 20th century military sites in Bratislava

It seems to be the fate of military sites and objects in Bratislava that none of them were ever used for the purposes they were built for - cavernas from WWI, bunkers from WWII, nuclear shelters or the anti-aircraft…

One nuclear shelter with a capacity for several hundred people now serves as a music club with suitable name Subclub (formerly U-club).