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Slovakia invited toglobal music festival

FROM New York to London, Paris to Sydney, and in many other cities worldwide, thousands of musicians and volunteers are busy preparing the 2004 One World Beat Global Music Festival, which is set to be one of the largest musical charity extravaganzas since Live Aid.
So far, 25 countries and 100 performers are readying for the festival's second year.

FROM New York to London, Paris to Sydney, and in many other cities worldwide, thousands of musicians and volunteers are busy preparing the 2004 One World Beat Global Music Festival, which is set to be one of the largest musical charity extravaganzas since Live Aid.

So far, 25 countries and 100 performers are readying for the festival's second year. Slovakia is not yet on the list, though festival organisers are looking for musicians and music venues to represent the country.

The events will take place simultaneously on the weekend of March 19 to 21 to raise money for Keep A Child Alive, a charity that provides medical equipment for children suffering from AIDS and HIV in the developing world. The performance program pays no respect to genre or level of fame. Participants pledge some or all of their profits to One World Beat, which will send them directly to the charity.

More information about the festival is available at the official website, www.oneworldbeat.org">www.oneworldbeat.org. Bands or venues interested in taking part in the festival can contact Mark Roach via email at markroach@oneworldbeat.org.

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