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Danglár's cartoons in Washington

POPULAR Slovak cartoonist Jozef "Danglár" Gertli is exhibiting his Illustrations & Other Funny Pictures at the Koloman Sokol Gallery (in the Embassy of Slovakia) in Washington.
Danglár has illustrated dozens of books by contemporary Slovak writers, such as the Rivers of Babylon trilogy by Peter Pišťanek, and has worked for several newspapers and magazines, including SME, Pravda, Domino Fórum, and the Czech daily Mladá Fronta Dnes.

POPULAR Slovak cartoonist Jozef "Danglár" Gertli is exhibiting his Illustrations & Other Funny Pictures at the Koloman Sokol Gallery (in the Embassy of Slovakia) in Washington.

Danglár has illustrated dozens of books by contemporary Slovak writers, such as the Rivers of Babylon trilogy by Peter Pišťanek, and has worked for several newspapers and magazines, including SME, Pravda, Domino Fórum, and the Czech daily Mladá Fronta Dnes.

The largest publication he has worked on so far is the book Roger Kroviak - written by a team of authors and featuring more than 70 of his pictures - which initially started as a comic strip on the back page of Kultúrny život.

Born in Detva in 1962, Danglár studied at the University of Fine Arts in Bratislava. He lives and works in Bratislava.

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